The iconic tree has graced the plaza at Rockefeller Center since 1931.

By Hannah Chubb
October 24, 2019
NICHOLAS HUNT/WIREIMAGE

It’s (almost) the most wonderful time of the year!

Despite the fact that Halloween and Thanksgiving are still ahead, the folks over at Rockefeller Center already have their sights set on Christmas. The 2019 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has officially been selected, and will grace the streets of New York City with its dazzling lights in just a few short weeks.

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This year’s massive Norway Spruce hails from the Village of Florida in Orange County, New York, and will be cut down on Thursday, November 7 before being raised at Rockefeller Plaza on Saturday, November 9.

Rockefeller Center revealed their selection to the public via Instagram, sharing a photo of the winning spruce.

“Each year, Rockefeller Center receives submissions from families in hopes their tree will bring joy to the millions who visit Rockefeller Plaza during the holiday season,” reads the caption. “We usually select a Norway spruce that is later on in its life cycle, and plant a young one in its place.”

So as not to be wasteful, the organization shared that once the holidays have passed, the tree will be recycled as lumber and donated to Habitat for Humanity for use in their various projects.

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There are no further details about the size or age of this year’s tree, but last year’s was a 75-year-old, 72-foot-tall Norway spruce that “grew up” 70 miles outside of Manhattan in Wallkill, New York.

It was adorned with more than 50,000 multi-colored LEDs and topped with a Swarovski star designed by architect Daniel Libeskin. The star weighed about 900 lbs. and featured 70 spikes covered in 3 million Swarovski crystals.

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Though it will arrive in the Big Apple in November, the 2019 tree will not be lit until December 4, during a much-anticipated ceremony — an annual tradition televised on NBC.

The iconic tree will remain on display until January 14, 2020.

This story originally appeared on PEOPLE.com.

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