Check your pantries, sort through your refrigerators, and study up before you make your next restaurant order! Food safety experts recommend you steer clear of these items included in food recalls that could make you sick.

By Karla Walsh
August 01, 2018

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has had a busy summer tracking down and reporting ingredients linked to dangerous (and sometimes deadly) foodborne illnesses. Below, study up on eight of the most far-reaching food recalls of the past two months so you can keep yourself and your family safe.

1. Flower Foods, Inc. Swiss Rolls

Getty: bbeltman

A whey powder used in many brands of chocolate and cream “Swiss” sweet rolls may be contaminated with salmonella, according to a press release by the large baked good company Flower Foods, Inc. The affected products have been pulled off shelves at Walmart (Great Value brand), Food Lion, and Texas-based H-E-B grocery stores and include the following brand names: Mrs. Freshley’s Baker’s Treat, Market Square, and Captain John Dessert’s Old Fashioned Bread.

Learn more about the Swiss Rolls recall.

2. McDonald’s Salads

Image courtesy of mcdonalds.com

More than 280 customers have been diagnosed with cyclospora (a foodborne pathogen that is caused by a single-cell parasite) after consuming McDonald’s salads, says the latest CDC Case Count Map. The fast-food restaurant hopes to tame the outbreak by ceasing salad sales in states with outbreaks and switching lettuce-blend suppliers.

Learn more about the McDonald’s Salad recall.

3. Select Pepperidge Farm Goldfish

Four flavors of the fish-shape cheddar crackers have been recalled, as they may have been produced with salmonella-contaminated whey powder. No illnesses have been reported yet, but Pepperidge Farm is urging snackers to toss or return Flavor Blasted Xtra Cheddar, Flavor Blasted Sour Cream & Onion, Goldfish Baked with Whole Grain Xtra Cheddar, and Goldfish Mix Xtra Cheddar + Pretzel varieties.

Learn more about the Pepperidge Farm Goldfish recall.

 

4. Select Ritz Cracker Products

Getty: Joe Raedle / Staff

In related whey powder news, Mondelez International (the parent company of Ritz crackers), launched a voluntary recall of more than 16 Ritz snacks that may have been contaminated with salmonella. Affected products were sold in all 50 states, and are the snack packs and packages that include dairy.

Learn more about the Ritz Cracker Sandwiches and Ritz Bits recall.

5. Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal

Image courtesy of CDC.gov

Salmonella is also the root cause of a large Kellogg’s cereal recall. The CDC asked consumers to throw away all boxes of the honey-laced puffed wheat cereal Honey Smacks —regardless of the date or package size—after more than 70 people were diagnosed with salmonella.

Learn more about the Kellogg’s Honey Smacks recall.

6. Select Del Monte Precut Vegetable Trays

Sold at several gas stations and grocery stores, ready-to-eat Del Monte snack trays featuring broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and dill dip led to 78 confirmed cases of cyclosporiasis, a parasitic intestinal illness. Related products have a “Best If Enjoyed By” date of June 17 or earlier, so all should be off shelves by now. Check packaging for the date to confirm safety.

Learn more about the Del Monte recall.

7. Taco Bell Salsa con Queso

Image courtesy of Amazon.com

Kraft Heinz recalled 7,000 cases of the mild cheese dip after jars showed separation, a factor that can allow for growth of the toxin that causes botulism. Don’t judge a jar by smell; instead check for a “Best When Used By” date of October 31, 2018, to January 23, 2019.

Learn more about the Taco Bell Salsa con Queso recall.

8. Imported Crabmeat

Steer clear of imported crab, especially from Venezuela, warn the FDA and CDC. The common dip and rangoon addition could contain vibrio parahaemolyticus, a bacteria that can cause chronic vomiting, diarrhea, or dangerously high fevers. Infected crabmeat could also potentially contaminate other foods in your kitchen, too, so take a look at the origin of your tubs of seafood.

Learn more about the crabmeat recall.

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