Split Pea Soup

3.9
(21)

Loaded with carrots, ham, and split peas, this healthy soup is a meal in itself, and it freezes well.

Split Pea Soup
Photo: Mike Dieter
Prep Time:
25 mins
Cook Time:
80 mins
Total Time:
105 mins
Servings:
12

Ingredients

  • 8 cup water

  • 3 14 ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth

  • 1 pound cooked boneless ham, chopped

  • 4 ½ cup dry split peas, rinsed and drained

  • 3 bay leaves

  • ¼ teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed

  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

  • 1 ½ cup chopped carrots (3 medium)

  • 1 ½ cup chopped celery (3 medium)

  • 1 ½ cup chopped onion (3 medium)

  • Salt and ground black pepper

Directions

  1. In a 7- to 8-quart Dutch oven combine water, broth, ham, split peas, bay leaves, marjoram, and pepper. Bring mixture to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Uncover; stir in carrots, celery, and onions. Bring to boiling. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Remove bay leaves; discard. Stir to combine (mixture may appear separated). Serve immediately or cool for 30 minutes.

Tips

To freeze, divide cooled soup among three 2-quart (8-cup) freezer containers. Cover; label. Freeze up to 3 months.

Tips

To reheat frozen soup, dip the bottom of the container in hot water for 5 minutes. Transfer frozen soup to a large saucepan. Cook, covered, over medium-low heat about 30 minutes or until heated through, stirring occasionally. Makes 12 servings (or three 4-serving portions)

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

334 Calories
5g Fat
49g Carbs
25g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 12
Calories 334
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g 6%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Cholesterol 22mg 7%
Sodium 866mg 38%
Total Carbohydrate 49g 18%
Total Sugars 8g
Protein 25g
Vitamin C 4.1mg 21%
Calcium 70.7mg 5%
Iron 4mg 22%
Potassium 1020mg 22%
Folate, total 213.7mcg
Vitamin B-12 0.4mcg
Vitamin B-6 0.3mg

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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