Rice and Bean Frittata

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This Rice and Bean Frittata recipe is an easy breakfast frittata for your next lazy weekend brunch. It's loaded with zucchini, wild rice, beans, and cheese for a hearty, well-balanced way to start the day.

Rice and Bean Frittata
Photo: Kritsada Panichgul
Total Time:
25 mins
Servings:
4

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon vegetable oil

  • 2 cup sliced zucchini and/or yellow summer squash (1 medium)*

  • 1 8.8 ounce pouch cooked long grain and wild rice

  • 1 15 ounce can red, navy, or garbanzo beans (chickpeas), rinsed and drained

  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten

  • ¼ cup milk

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

  • 1 cup shredded colby and Monterey Jack cheese, cheddar cheese, or Swiss cheese (4 ounces)

  • Cherry tomatoes (optional)

  • Fresh parsley (optional)

Directions

  1. In a large skillet heat oil over medium-high heat. Add zucchini to skillet; cook and stir just until crisp-tender.

  2. Microwave rice according to package directions. Add rice and beans to squash in skillet; gently stir to combine.

  3. In a medium bowl combine eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Pour egg mixture over rice mixture in skillet. Cook over medium heat. As mixture sets, run a spatula around the edges of the skillet, lifting egg mixture so uncooked portion flows underneath. Continue cooking and lifting edges just until egg mixture is set. Sprinkle with cheese. If desired, top with cherry tomatoes and parsley.

*Tip

If you like, halve zucchini or yellow summer squash lengthwise before slicing.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

490 Calories
27g Fat
36g Carbs
26g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 4
Calories 490
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 27g 35%
Saturated Fat 10g 50%
Cholesterol 312mg 104%
Sodium 912mg 40%
Total Carbohydrate 36g 13%
Total Sugars 5g
Protein 26g
Vitamin C 11.4mg 57%
Calcium 340mg 26%
Iron 3.4mg 19%
Potassium 598mg 13%
Folate, total 80.5mcg
Vitamin B-12 1mcg
Vitamin B-6 0.3mg

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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