Pork and Poblano Stew

4.3
(61)

This stew is loaded with Vitamin A, low in fat, and hearty enough to feed any hungry family. The poblano pepper adds a punch of flavor so you don't need much in the way of extra fat or salt.

Pork and Poblano Stew
Photo: Andy Lyons
Prep Time:
15 mins
Cook Time:
24 mins
Total Time:
39 mins
Servings:
4
Yield:
6 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoon hot chili powder

  • 1 ¼ pound pork tenderloin, cut into 3/4- to 1-inch pieces

  • 2 tablespoon olive oil

  • 1 fresh poblano chile pepper, seeded and cut into 1 inch pieces

  • 1 large red sweet pepper, seeded and cut into 1 inch pieces

  • 1 medium onion cut into thin wedges

  • 1 14.5 ounce can fire-roasted tomatoes with garlic, undrained

  • 1 14.5 ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth

  • 3 inches stick cinnamon

  • 2 teaspoon finely shredded orange peel

  • ¼ cup fresh orange juice

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, sprinkle chili powder over pork. Toss to combine.

  2. In a large saucepan heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Cook the pork, about 4 minutes or until cooked through, stirring occasionally. Remove pork from saucepan; set aside.

  3. Add remaining oil to saucepan. Add poblano pepper, sweet pepper, and onion to saucepan. Cook over medium-high heat until vegetables are just tender, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, broth, and cinnamon stick. Bring to boiling. Reduce heat. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat for 10 minutes. Uncover and add reserved pork and orange juice. Return to a simmer for 5 minutes more. Stir in orange peel.

  4. To serve, remove stick cinnamon. Ladle into shallow bowls.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

300 Calories
11g Fat
16g Carbs
32g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 4
Calories 300
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 11g 14%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Cholesterol 87mg 29%
Sodium 534mg 23%
Total Carbohydrate 16g 6%
Total Sugars 8g
Protein 32g
Vitamin C 137.6mg 688%
Calcium 80.8mg 6%
Iron 3.8mg 21%
Potassium 1077mg 23%
Folate, total 40.3mcg
Vitamin B-12 0.6mcg
Vitamin B-6 1mg

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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