13 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 6
  • 4 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 2
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 1

Like caramel apples? Then you'll melt over this Dutch apple cake with caramel glaze recipe. It features everything you remember about the classic fall dessert--mixed into a cinnamon-scented cake.

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Ingredients

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Butter and flour a 13x9x2-inch baking pan; set aside. Peel apples; quarter, core and cut each quarter in half lengthwise, then crosswise (16 pieces from each apple).

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  • In a medium bowl whisk together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg; set aside.

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  • In a very large mixing bowl whisk eggs to combine. Whisk in oil, sugars, and vanilla until well-blended. Gradually whisk in the flour mixture just until well blended. Fold apples and pecans into batter (batter will be thick and just coat apples). Turn into prepared pan, spreading to edges of pan.

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  • Bake about 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack while preparing glaze. Spoon glaze over warm cake.

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Nutrition Facts

568 calories, (7 g saturated fat, 8 g polyunsaturated fat, 19 g monounsaturated fat), 61 mg cholesterol, 256 mg sodium, 62 g carbohydrates, 2 g fiber, 41 g sugar, 5 g protein.

Caramel Glaze

Ingredients

Directions

  • In a medium skillet, melt butter. Add dark brown sugar, light brown sugar, whipping cream, and salt. Cook and stir until blended over medium-low heat for 2 minutes. Increase heat and boil for 2 minutes or until dime-size bubbles cover the surface of the glaze. Remove from heat. Cool about 5 minutes or until glaze begins to thicken. Spoon over cake.

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Reviews (1)

13 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 6
  • 4 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 2
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 1
Rating: 5 stars
04/04/2017
Excellent! Used Gala apples. Did not have half and half so used whole milk in glaze, which made it thinner. It soaked into cake and was delicious.