Chicken and Biscuit Kabobs

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(1)

Kids love these baked skewers loaded with chicken, biscuits, and summer squash or zucchini. Melted butter and honey make a great dipping sauce. Instead of chicken, try thick slices of fully cooked smoked sausage.

R089568_070506
Bake Time:
10 mins
Total Time:
20 mins
Servings:
4

Ingredients

  • ½ 13.5 ounce package (12) frozen, cooked breaded chicken breast chunks

  • 1 4.5 ounce package (6) refrigerated buttermilk or country biscuits

  • 1 medium zucchini and/or yellow summer squash, cut into 3x3/4-inch strips

  • cup butter, melted*

  • 3 tablespoon honey*

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Arrange chicken chunks in a single layer on a microwave-safe plate. Microwave, uncovered, on 100 percent power (high) for 1 minute (chicken will not be heated through but allows the skewer to be easily inserted).

  2. Use a kitchen scissors to snip or a knife to cut each biscuit in half. On each of four metal or wooden skewers alternately thread chicken pieces, biscuit halves, and squash, leaving about 1/4 inch space between pieces. Place skewers on ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes or until biscuits are golden brown and chicken is heated through.

  3. Meanwhile, whisk together melted butter and honey. Drizzle some of the mixture over kabobs. Pass remainder for dipping.

  4. Makes 4 kabob

*

Substitute 1/2 cup honey-butter for the melted butter and honey. Place in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave, uncovered, on 100 percent power (high) for 35 to 45 seconds or until melted.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

376 Calories
22g Fat
37g Carbs
10g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 4
Calories 376
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 22g 28%
Saturated Fat 9g 45%
Cholesterol 57mg 19%
Sodium 649mg 28%
Total Carbohydrate 37g 13%
Total Sugars 16g
Protein 10g
Vitamin C 5.9mg 30%
Calcium 10.1mg 1%
Iron 1.1mg 6%
Potassium 263mg 6%
Folate, total 12.1mcg
Vitamin B-12 0.1mcg
Vitamin B-6 0.1mg

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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