Bacon, Corn, and Cheese Frittata

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Want breakfast in a hurry? Don't worry--this tasty, bacon-filled frittata can be made in your pressure cooker! You'll be digging into breakfast (or brunch) in just over 30 minutes.

Bacon, Corn, and Cheese Frittata
Photo: Andy Lyons
Prep Time:
15 mins
Cook Time:
18 mins
Total Time:
33 mins
Servings:
4

Ingredients

  • Nonstick cooking spray

  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten

  • ¾ cup fresh or frozen whole kernel corn, thawed

  • ½ cup thinly sliced green onions

  • 6 slices bacon, crisp-cooked and crumbled

  • ¼ cup finely chopped roasted red sweet peppers

  • ¼ cup half-and-half

  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

  • ¾ cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese with jalapeno peppers (3 ounces)

  • ¼ cup chopped fresh chives or parsley

Directions

  1. Lightly coat a 1 1/2-quart soufflé dish or round casserole with cooking spray. In a medium bowl combine the next eight ingredients (through salt). Stir in 1/2 cup of the cheese. Transfer egg mixture to prepared dish. Top with remaining 1/4 cup cheese.

  2. Place a steam rack in a 5- to 6-qt. electric or stove-top pressure cooker. Add 1 cup water to pot. Place filled dish on trivet. Lock lid in place. Set electric cooker on high pressure 18 minutes. For a stove-top cooker, bring up to pressure over medium-high heat; reduce heat enough to maintain steady (but not excessive) pressure. Cook 18 minutes. Remove from heat. Let stand 15 minutes to naturally release pressure. Release any remaining pressure. Open lid carefully. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Sprinkle with chives.

Nutrition Facts (per serving)

303 Calories
19g Fat
10g Carbs
20g Protein
Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe 4
Calories 303
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 19g 24%
Saturated Fat 9g 45%
Cholesterol 315mg 105%
Sodium 639mg 28%
Total Carbohydrate 10g 4%
Total Sugars 3g
Protein 20g
Vitamin C 13.7mg 69%
Calcium 228mg 18%
Iron 1.9mg 11%
Potassium 295mg 6%
Folate, total 58mcg
Vitamin B-12 0.8mcg
Vitamin B-6 0.3mg

*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

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