According to a new study, we're not so different after all. See how owners of cats and dogs share similar traits.

By Dan Nosowitz
May 14, 2019

Are you more of a dog person or a cat person? According to Rover, a pet-sitting app, the line that divides us might not be so firm after all. The company recently released surveys results that found that cat and dog people aren’t really that different. Here are five ways dog and cat lovers are more alike than we think.

1. We say hello to our pets before our family.

Look, if our family came running up to us as soon as we approached the front door, maybe we’d say hi to them first. But as it stands, 69 percent of dog owners and 67 percent of cat owners greet their pets first upon arriving home. 

2. Our pets have names. Plural.

Seventy percent of both dog and cat owners said that their pets have both a name and a nickname. In fact, those participants even had between one and five nicknames for their pets. Some of those are likely to be variations on a pet’s given name; Peter the dog might become Petey, Petester, or Petey-poo. (These are real examples.) There’s just something about a pet that begs for nickname versatility.

3. We like to sing to our pets.

Ah, the loving, nonjudgmental gaze of a pet. They’re sure to never tell you that you’ve forgotten the lyrics, or that you’re consistently off key. According to the survey, both cat and dog people sing to their pets quite a bit—70 percent of cat owners and 63 percent of dog owners—and even make up our own songs to sing to our pets.

4. We sacrifice the sofa.

Sure, there’s hair everywhere, but that’s the deal we made when we got our pets. About 61 percent of both cat and dog owners said that their pets are spoiled and will “take over” a couch or bed. They just look so sleepy and comfortable—who has the willpower to kick them off?

5. Cuddle time is important.

Both dog and cat owners say they spend one to two hours per day cuddling with their pets. That’s not just enjoyable, it’s can play a major role in our happiness. According to various studies, cuddling with pets triggers the release of oxytocin in both the owner and the pet. Oxytocin correlates with positive social behavior, including trust and affiliative feelings.

So while you might file yourself away as a dog person or a cat person, there are more similarities amongst pet owners than you might think. Now, who has a lint roller?

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