Banish soap scum, hard water stains, and mildew from your shower door without harsh chemicals. Try our tips for cleaning glass shower doors, including recommendations for the best tools and homemade cleaners, to keep them gleaming after each use.
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A glass shower door adds modern elegance to your bathroom, but like other bathroom fixtures exposed to moisture, unsightly grime and mineral deposits can build up. If the surface looks streaky, stained, or foggy, try one of these tricks for cleaning glass shower doors. A simple DIY shower cleaner made with ingredients you have around the house can help remove tough stains without strong, irritating chemicals. And don't forget to clean your shower door tracks, too! Once your shower door is sparkling, put some prevention tactics into action to make cleaning your shower door easier next time.

shower cleaning tools squeegee and sponges
Credit: Avery Powell

How Often to Clean Glass Shower Doors

Hard water spots form when drops of water dry on the glass, and mold and mildew can grow in damp environments. To keep glass shower doors clean and grime-free, prevention is key. "The best thing you can do is squeegee the door after each use," Koenig says. Keep one hanging in your shower to make it easy, and remind family members to do it after each time they shower. A basic squeegee costs less than $20 and saves you lots of time and frustration. "It'll help keep hard-water deposits from building up, so you won't have to scrub so much later," she says.

Plan to wipe down shower doors every night after the last person has bathed for the day. This is also the best time to clean your shower surround because the warm water has already loosened up the grime. Use a sponge or foam cleaning pad, such as a Magic Eraser ($3, Walmart), to avoid the need for additional cleaning products or toxic chemicals. Cross multiple chores off your list by cleaning shower doors, walls, and floors at the same time.

Leaving the door open after a shower will also help dry it out. To further prevent hard water spots and keep shower doors clean, spray the doors with a water repellent spray, such as Rain-X, or consider installing a water softener to reduce mineral buildup.

Glass Shower Door Cleaning Schedule:

If you keep up with regular light maintenance, you should only have to deep-clean shower doors every few weeks. Here's a good shower cleaning schedule to follow:

Every day: After using the shower, squeegee glass shower doors and leave the door open to air out.

Weekly: Give your entire shower a wipe-down once a week with a sponge or foam cleaning pad.

Once a month: It's time for a deep clean. Thoroughly scrub your entire shower, making sure to get in any nooks and crannies. Apply a water repellent spray to prevent hard water stains on glass shower doors.

black white modern bathroom with plants
Credit: Adam Albright

How to Clean Shower Doors with Vinegar

For a homemade shower-door cleaner, mix distilled white vinegar (heated first) with the grease-cutting powerr of dish detergent, such as Dawn, in equal proportions. Pour the solution into a spray bottle and spray it on the front and back of the doors. Let the mixture stand for about 30 minutes or until it has cut through the grime. Rinse off the solution using fresh water and a damp sponge, and dry the glass with a microfiber cloth.

This vinegar and dish-soap solution works for most showers, but use caution when cleaning shower doors with vinegar. If your shower is made of stone, vinegar could damage it. Instead, mix some liquid soap with baking soda until it's the consistency of frosting, says Kris Koenig, CEO of Natura Clean. Scrub this eco-friendly cleaner onto the glass shower door with a nonscratch sponge, then rinse with warm water.

diy shower cleaning products
Credit: Blaine Moats

How to Clean Shower Doors With Lemon

Say goodbye to annoying streaks with this trick to clean glass shower doors without residue, courtesy of Leslie Reichert, author of The Joy of Green Cleaning. Cut a lemon in half and dip the cut side in baking soda, then rub on both sides of the glass door. The acid in the lemon reacts with the baking soda, making a sudsy foam. "Once you get the glass clean, I like rubbing it with a little lemon oil, too," she says. "The oil will repel the water so the soap doesn't dry on the glass." As a bonus, the fresh lemon scent is much more pleasant than bleach.

narrow glass shower with modern accents

How to Clean Shower Door Tracks

The edges or tracks of your shower door need attention, too. These creases are a prime target for mold and trapped soap scum if you forget about them while cleaning shower doors. Use a toothbrush to scrub the metal frame around your shower door. A paint scraper ($5, Walmart) can help remove gunk where the metal meets the shower or door, and a razor blade scraper ($1, The Home Depot), when carefully and gently applied, can scrape mineral spots off the flat glass. Be sure to use a clean, sharp blade and hold it at a 45-degree angle to the surface to avoid scratching the glass.

shelf of cleaning supplies
Credit: Steven McDonald

How to Make a Daily Shower Spray

Using a shower spray daily can allow you more time between deep cleans. Make your own cleaner on the cheap (and without harsh chemicals) by mixing 1 cup water, 1/2 cup vinegar, a little dish soap, and 10-20 drops of your favorite essential oil for scent, if desired. Keep it in the shower and spray the glass door down after squeegeeing. (Again, skip the vinegar if you have a stone tile shower.)

By Berit Thorkelson and Caitlin Sole

    Comments (2)

    Better Homes & Gardens Member
    October 30, 2018
    We squeegee after every shower, and then we use a Dollar Store shammy to dry the glass completely. We also shammy the metal fixtures dry. Our shower stays really clean and I only have to clean the base with bleach cleaner a couple times a year as we have little soap scum and no mold. I use an old toothbrush to reach in tight spots with the bleach cleaner.
    Better Homes & Gardens Member
    September 20, 2018
    We replaced our shower doors about 2 years ago. They came with a protective film on the inside to protect from shattering. Unfortunately, you are unable to use any type of abrasive cleaner in it to remove soap build up, etc so they have never looked as great as the day they were put in. I have purchased many cleaners, scrubbed the doors with lemons, oranges, many concoctions of vinegar and whatever, BUT nothing has brought them back as incredibly as your suggestion above for baking soda mixed with Dawn (frosting consistancy) and applied with a Mr. Clean white foam pad. They look amazing! Thank you so much! Lisa P. Maryland