Plant Type
Sunlight Amount

Stately fan palms really stand out in the landscape with their large, star-shape leaves. Most types of fan palms are hardy, single-trunk palms that grow fast.
Many of these palms hold onto their leaves as they age, creating a brown, shaggy "beard" underneath the fresh foliage. These old leaves can be a fire hazard, so some communities require you remove them.

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Fan Palm Tree

Stately fan palms really stand out in the landscape with their large, star-shape leaves. Most types of fan palms are hardy, single-trunk palms that grow fast.

Many of these palms hold onto their leaves as they age, creating a brown, shaggy "beard" underneath the fresh foliage. These old leaves can be a fire hazard, so some communities require you remove them.

genus name
  • Washingtonia
light
  • Sun
plant type
  • Tree
height
  • 20 feet or more
width
  • 8-12 feet wide
problem solvers
zones
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
propagation

Fan Palm Tree

Stately fan palms really stand out in the landscape with their large, star-shape leaves. Most types of fan palms are hardy, single-trunk palms that grow fast.

Many of these palms hold onto their leaves as they age, creating a brown, shaggy "beard" underneath the fresh foliage. These old leaves can be a fire hazard, so some communities require you remove them.

genus name
  • Washingtonia
light
  • Sun
plant type
  • Tree
height
  • 20 feet or more
width
  • 8-12 feet wide
problem solvers
zones
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
propagation

More varieties for Fan palm

Desert fan palm

(Washingtonia filifera) is native to the American Southwest, where it grows in the desert near water sources. The trunk can reach 3 feet wide and, unless trimmed, is covered with a petticoat of old leaves. Leaf stems are armed with sharp teeth. It grows 50-70 feet tall and 10-12 feet wide. Desert fan palm makes an excellent street tree in dry climates. Zones 9-11

Mexican fan palm

(Washingtonia robusta) is similar to desert fan palm, but is slightly taller and thinner. It grows 60-80 feet tall and 8-10 feet wide, with a trunk up to 18 inches thick. Old leaves cling to the stem, creating a reddish brown petticoat. Mexican fan palm can be used as a street tree or in a grouping. Zones 9-11

ideas for growing some of our favorite trees and shrubs

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