Herbs

Herbs

Growing herbs is a simple way to add edible plants to your garden. Most herbs are very versatile, and grow well in the ground or in containers. Herbs, which generally are annuals except in very warm climates, make a great addition to a traditional flower garden, and are also a pretty, practical accent to windowboxes or containers near a grill or outside a kitchen door. If you're unfamiliar with growing herbs, or simply want to find out how to tend less-familiar varieties of these edible plants, the Herbs section of the Better Homes and Gardens Plant Encyclopedia includes details on growing requirements for each herb, such as sunlight or shade, water preferences, and USDA Hardiness Zones. You'll also learn expert tips for growing the most delicious herbs possible, as well as ideas for using herbs in your favorite recipes. View a list of herbs by common name or scientific name below.

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54 Herbs
Sage, Salvia officinalis
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Zones:
4-10
Type:
Herb, Perennial

From medicinal to culinary use, sage has been a garden staple for quite some time. Today this plant is most commonly grown for its extensive culinary use. Even when not used as a flavoring agent, sage makes a wonderful perennial plant in the garden or container garden. Sage's light blue flowers and gray/green foliage help it look at home in any flower border.

Salvia, Salvia
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Type:
Annual, Herb

There are few gardens that don't have at least one salvia growing in them. Whether you have sun or shade, a dry garden or lots of rainfall, there's an annual salvia that you'll find indispensable. All attract hummingbirds, especially the red ones, and are great picks for hot, dry sites where you want tons of color all season. Most salvias don't like cool weather, so plant them outdoors after all danger of frost has passed.

Savory, Satureja species
Light:
Sun
Height:
From 6 inches to 3 feet
Zones:
5-11
Type:
Annual, Herb, Perennial

The flavor of savory is best described as peppery with a hint of oregano. This herb packs a delightful flavor punch and is easy-to-grow. Summer savory has a fine, feathery texture. An annual, summer savory (Satureja hortensis) foliage turns a striking shade of bronze-purple in late summer. Use it as an ornamental and culinary plant in the landscape. It’s a delightful addition to cottage gardens and flower beds. Winter savory (Satureja montana) is a perennial plant with stiff foliage and a stronger flavor than summer savory. 

Shiso, Perilla
Light:
Part Sun, Shade, Sun
Height:
Under 6 inches to 3 feet
Type:
Annual, Herb

Grown for its boldly colored leaves, shiso is a container gardener’s dream plant. Exceptionally tolerant of high heat and dry growing conditions, shiso looks good through summer’s hottest days. Pair it with other heat lovers, such as lantana and mandevilla, or simply fill a container with several shiso plants for a pretty pot from spring until frost. 

Sorrel, Rumex spp.
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
Under 6 inches to 3 feet
Zones:
3-8
Type:
Herb, Perennial, Water

Sorrel begins growth in early spring, providing salad greens when few other edibles are available. The plant thrives in full sun or partial shade, and it prefers moist soil. Some types can be grown in shallow water. Sorrel develops a mound of foliage that grows 12-18 inches tall, and it sends up a flower stalk with green flowers that mature to reddish-brown seeds. Remove seed stalks to prevent the plant from self-sowing. 

Stevia, Stevia rebaudiana
Light:
Sun
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Zones:
10-11
Type:
Herb

Stevia develops sweet-tasting foliage that's an excellent alternative to sugar or artificial sweeteners. Given enough moisture, this tropical plant thrives in containers or in the landscape. Just be sure to plant it where the soil drains well; stevia will not thrive in constantly wet soil and resents heavy clay. Avoid using high nitrogen fertilizers. In northern climates, move stevia indoors before frost hits and treat it like a houseplant.

Sweet Cicely, Myrrhis odorata
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
3 to 8 feet
Zones:
3-7
Type:
Herb

Sweet cicely is one of the few herbs that thrives in the shade. It prefers moist soil and cool temperatures. All parts of sweet cicely are edible and impart a slight anise flavor to recipes. Use the leaves either fresh or dried in salads. Seeds are sometimes substituted for caraway; roots may be peeled, boiled, and eaten as a vegetable. The plant grows 3 feet tall and wide with fernlike foliage. In late spring, sweet cicely bears clusters of attractive white flowers. 

Sweet Grass, Hierochloe odorata
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Zones:
3-7
Type:
Herb, Perennial

Also called holygrass or bisongrass, sweetgrass is a native prairie grass prized for its fresh scent. It grows naturally in meadows and along stream banks. Native American tribes have long used sweetgrass for making smudge sticks as well as for weaving baskets. The plant spreads up to 2 feet wide annually, so plant it where it can be confined. It eventually forms a thick mat of foliage that tends to flop over unless cut back.

Sweet Woodruff, Galium odoratum
Light:
Part Sun, Shade
Height:
6 to 12 inches
Zones:
4-9
Type:
Herb, Perennial

Sweet woodruff makes a big statement in the shade garden. In spring, the plants are smothered with white flowers and the foliage has a sweet, haylike fragrance. It makes a great groundcover for hard-to-plant dark corners of the landscape. Sweet woodruff can become invasive if given the right conditions. Plant it where you can control it easily. It does not tolerate drought. 

Tarragon, Artemisia dracunculus
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 1 to 8 feet
Zones:
3-9
Type:
Herb, Perennial, Shrub

French tarragon creates a shrubby presence in the garden border, combining fine texture with wonderful green-to-gray foliage. Leaves dish up a sweet anise flavor used to create traditional Bearnaise sauce and the fines herbes blend vital to French cooking. In rich soil, plants practically jump out of the ground, thriving with little care. For best growth, remove flowering stems. With a sunny window and rich soil, you can raise French tarragon indoors. If light isn't strong enough, stems will likely sprawl and leaf flavor will diminish, but you'll still be able to savor the licorice taste. In the garden, pair French tarragon with bearded iris, burgundy-toned shrubs, or lilies for an eye-pleasing scene. In coldest zones, cut plants back in fall and mulch after the ground freezes.

Thyme, Thymus
Light:
Sun
Height:
Under 6 inches to 12 inches
Zones:
4-9
Type:
Herb, Perennial

While thyme can be grown to add color to your garden, most folks plant thyme to use as an herb for cooking. This tough and rugged perennial often forms dense mats of foliage that are topped with attractive blossoms. There are also some wonderful filler varieties that can be planted between rocks and paths, and some varieties can even be used as a lawn substitute. Consider planting thyme near paths, they release a delightful fragrance when brushed. Many cooks plant thyme near the kitchen so they can easily snip a stem or two when cooking.

Valerian, Valeriana officinalis
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
3 to 8 feet
Zones:
4-9
Type:
Herb, Perennial

This upright perennial herb, also called garden heliotrope, is topped with white to pinkish-white fragrant flowers in midsummer. The blooms were once used in perfume production. Cats also find the plant attractive and may rub against the foliage as they do with catnip. Valerian attracts butterflies to the garden. Remove spent flowers to prevent the plant from self-sowing. 

Vietnamese Coriander, Persicaria odorata
Light:
Part Sun, Shade
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Zones:
10-11
Type:
Herb

This Southeast Asian native is often used as a coriander substitute in Vietnamese cuisine. It adds a lemony coriander flavor to fresh salads, summer rolls, soups, and salads. In Zones 10 and 11, it can be grown outdoors in a moist, semishaded location as a perennial. Elsewhere, grow it as an annual or in a container to bring indoors over winter. The silvery leaves often develop a maroon blotch that makes the plant quite ornamental.

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