Plant Type
Sunlight Amount

Gardeners turn to the sweet potato vine for its ability to power through just about anything while bringing interesting shapes, sizes, and colors to a pot or plot. A vigorous annual or a tender perennial, it takes off in summer heat. Typically used as spillers in containers, they also make fantastic groundcovers, typically spreading 4 to 6 feet.

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Sweet Potato Vine

Gardeners turn to the sweet potato vine for its ability to power through just about anything while bringing interesting shapes, sizes, and colors to a pot or plot. A vigorous annual or a tender perennial, it takes off in summer heat. Typically used as spillers in containers, they also make fantastic groundcovers, typically spreading 4 to 6 feet.

genus name
  • Ipomoea batatas
light
  • Part Sun
  • Sun
plant type
height
  • Under 6 inches
width
  • 3 to 6 feet wide
flower color
foliage color
special features
propagation
Peter Krumhardt

Sweet Potato Vine

Gardeners turn to the sweet potato vine for its ability to power through just about anything while bringing interesting shapes, sizes, and colors to a pot or plot. A vigorous annual or a tender perennial, it takes off in summer heat. Typically used as spillers in containers, they also make fantastic groundcovers, typically spreading 4 to 6 feet.

genus name
  • Ipomoea batatas
light
  • Part Sun
  • Sun
plant type
height
  • Under 6 inches
width
  • 3 to 6 feet wide
flower color
foliage color
special features
propagation

Po-tAY-to, Po-tAH-to

As the name would imply, these plants produce small tubers that can be eaten like common sweet potatoes or yams. However, they will not be nearly as tasty. Because sweet potato vines are bred to have such unique and colorful foliage, the traits for tubers (the storage roots) have slowly died out. This means the plants will spend more time focusing on growing vigorous, healthy foliage that it does storing nutrients in a root for later use.

Sweet Potato Vine Care Must-Knows

Sweet potato vine loves lots of sunlight and does best in the heat of summer. The plant is grown primarily for its wonderful foliage and tropical feel. Some of the older varieties may grace your garden with a few sporadic lavender blooms, but this is fairly uncommon. If they do, they may remind you of a slightly more tubular morning glory, and for good reason—sweet potato vine is a close cousin to this common annual vine.

New Innovations

Newer varieties of sweet potato vine are compact, have denser leaves, and are less likely to vigorously spread. This makes them perfect for container gardens, because they won't overtake companion plants.

You might notice that the foliage options have increased. The standard chartreuse and purple has expanded to mottled brown, bronze, variegated pink and white, and even almost black. The dark varieties look best in intense sun. In part shade, the nearly black fades to muddled purple and the golds and chartreuse to muted greens. Leaf shapes range from thin, fingerlike to heart shapes. Disease resistance has also been improved.

Sweet Potato Vine Propagation

If you can't bear to give up your plant after the season ends, you can either save the plant or propagate it for next year. Dig up the tuber in fall, before the first freeze, and store it in a cool, dry place. Come late winter/early spring, when the tuber begins to sprout, cut it into pieces, making sure each piece has at least one "eye." Plant the pieces. Cuttings can also be stuck in moist potting soil until rooted, then planted.

More Varieties of Sweet Potato Vine

William N. Hopkins

'Blackie' Sweet Potato Vine

Ipomoea batatas 'Blackie' offers purple hand-shape foliage on a vigorous plant.

Justin Hancock

Illusion Emerald Lace Sweet Potato Vine

Ipomoea batatas 'Illusion Emerald Lace' is a compact selection with bright lime-green foliage and a mounding/trailing habit. It grows 10 inches tall and spreads 4 feet across.

Justin Hancock

Illusion Midnight Lace Sweet Potato Vine

Ipomoea batatas 'Illusion Midnight Lace' has a compact, mounding/trailing habit and rich purple foliage. It grows 10 inches tall and spreads 4 feet across.

Marty Baldwin

'Marguerite' Sweet Potato Vine

Ipomoea batatas 'Marguerite' is an especially attractive selection with golden-chartreuse foliage.

Peter Krumhardt

'Sweet Caroline' Sweet Potato Vine

Ipomoea batatas 'Sweet Caroline' offers hand-shape foliage in an intriguing shade of coppery bronze.

Plant Sweet Potato Vine With:

David Speer

Angelonia

Angelonia is also called summer snapdragon, and once you get a good look at it, you'll know why. It has salvia-like flower spires that reach a foot or 2 high, but they're studded with fascinating snapdragon-like flowers with beautiful colorations in purple, white, or pink. It's the perfect plant for adding bright color to hot, sunny spaces. This tough plant blooms all summer long with spirelike spikes of blooms. While all varieties are beautiful, keep an eye out for the sweetly scented selections. While most gardeners treat angelonia as an annual, it is a tough perennial in Zones 9-10. Or, if you have a bright, sunny spot indoors, you can even keep it flowering all winter.

Laurie Dickson

African Marigold

There's nothing subtle about an African marigold, and thank goodness for that! It's a big, flamboyant, colorful punch of color for the sunny bed, border, or large container. Most are yellow, orange, or cream. Plants get up to 3 feet tall and produce huge 3-inch puffball blooms while dwarf varieties get just 1 foot tall. The mounded dark green foliage is always clean, fresh, and tidy. Grow them in a warm, sunny spot with moist, well-drained soil all summer long.

Peter Krumhardt

New Guinea Impatiens

Like their more common cousins, New Guinea impatiens provide hard-to-find brilliant color in shade. And it's not just the flowers. The foliage is often brilliantly, exotically colorful as well. These tropical plants really shine in containers, where they thrive in the perfect soil and drainage, but they also do well in the ground as long as you take the time to improve the soil and work in plenty of compost. Note that they're a bit more sun-tolerant than common impatiens.Plant established plants in spring after all danger of frost has passed. Keep soil moist and fertilize lightly but regularly.

Garden Plans For Sweet Potato Vine

Janet Mesic Mackie

Garden Plan for Partial Shade

This garden plan combines easy, adaptable plants to add color to spots that don't see full sun.

Download this plan!

Tom Rosborough

Raised Beds Garden Plan

Meander down a wonderful walkway flanked by a raised bed overflowing with lush swaths of annual flowers.

Download this plan!

Tom Rosborough

Tropical-Look Garden Plan

Make a bold garden statement with dramatic flowers and foliage.

Download this plan!

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