Make Succulent Planters With Vintage Finds

Turn funky found treasures into mini gardens—just
add soil, succulents, and water.

Panda plant Kalanchoe tomentosa

Succulents are unique and eye-catching plants all on their own. There are so many varieties to suit every personality. Why not give them a vessel that matches their interesting charm? Transform flea market or antiques shop finds, like thermoses, light fixtures, and broken typewriters, into vintage planters for a variety of succulent sizes, shapes, and colors.

Tune In

vintage radio succulent planter

Once a countertop essential, a turn-dial radio makes a groovy home for a succulent garden. Using a tiny screwdriver, remove the radio's back panel. With the help of wire cutters, pull out as much of the inner workings of the radio as possible. To make room for a planting vessel—a loaf pan works well—cut a rectangle opening out of the plastic top of the radio using a stencil cutter. Slip the container inside, replace the back panel, and plant.

Typing Topiary

vintage typewriter succulent planter

Celebrate a portable typewriter's years of service by bringing it to life with succulents. Using pliers, wire cutters, and a small screwdriver, remove all the typewriter's interior mechanisms. After the cavity is clean, nestle a small planting container—such as a disposable food storage bin—inside the typewriter. Fill the bin with cactus potting mix, and plant with a variety of succulents boasting unique textures, shapes, and colors. 

Everything You Need to Know About Succulents

Thirst Quencher

vintage thermos succulent planter

Cylindrical and sleek, retro thermoses with metallic sheens offer a fun contrast to the various fleshy, spiky, and curvy leaves of succulents. Fill each thermos and its lid with cactus potting mix. Add plants, firming the potting mix around the root zones. Water plants when the soil is dry to the touch.

Light Fixture

vintage wall sconce succulent planter

Turn the cone-shape metal shades of a desk lamp into a wall planter. Start by removing the lightbulbs from the shades and disconnecting all wiring. Fill any holes in the bases of the shades with silicone caulk to prepare them for planting. Drill two holes in the lamp's base plate and insert screws to attach the lamp to the wall, keeping the shades in an upright position. Fill the shades with potting mix and add succulents.

Hanging Succulent Heart Planter

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