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iGourmet Dried Chiles

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Ancho chiles are the dried form of the dark green poblano chile. Hailing from the state of Puebla, Mexico, Ancho chiles have an af...finity for braised pork and grilled meats. Soak in hot water for 30 minutes and add to sauces, chop into salsa, or grind the dried pods to create your own chile rubs. read more

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Chipotle chiles are smoked jalapenos. Brown Chipotles are the Green Jalapenos and the Moritas are the red, fully mature Chipotles.... This gives them a unique, medium - hot smokey flavor which is popular in many Southwestern dishes. read more

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These beautiful, finger-length chiles are a cousin of cayenne with a similar heat-level. We love adding two or three dried pods to... soups, stews, and chiles. They also add lovely color and flavor when added to a jar of olive oil or when making your own pickles. Crushed, they're perfect for whisking into dressings or sprinkling on top of pasta. read more

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The pasilla nergro is a large, black chile with a skin the color of eggplant. It's an important ingredient for mole, sauce, chile,... or making into a chile paste for rubbing on meats. Modestly hot, you can easily add them to a range of dishes. The flavor of dried pasilla chiles can benefit from moderate roasting, or soaking in hot water for a few minutes (for best results, don't soak the peppers more than 15-20 minutes). read more

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Beautiful guajillo chiles are perfect for salsas and spice pastes. Guajillo chiles have a modestly hot flavor with a slightly frui...ty aroma. The smooth, shiny skin is thicker than other chiles, so give them a little longer to soak that other varieties. Puree with tomatoes to make a thick dipping sauce. Also delicious as a compound butter to put on grilled pork chops or skirt steak. read more

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New Mexican Chiles are variant of the traditional Anaheim chile. Confusingly, some recipes also refer to New Mexican chiles as "Co...lorado Chiles." Hotter than jalapenos, these spicy chiles are great for adding to the broth of soups, or braising alongside pork. If you're a ribs fan, reconstitute the chiles in hot water, then puree into a fiery paste and add some kick to your rub. Or just crush into flakes and sprinkle over your favorite dishes! read more

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In Assam, India grows the world's hottest pepper called "Bhut Jolokia" in Hindi which when translated means "Ghost Chili". Also ca...lled the Naga Jolokia, after the famous Naga warriors of Northern India, who were fearsome headhunters. The Guinness World Records crowned the Bhut Jolokia as the world's spiciest chile in 2007, dethroning the red savina habanero. It has been measured at 855,000 Scoville units up to 1,041,427. Always remember to wear rubber gloves when handling chiles! read more

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The slightly smokey flavor makes the smokey serrano chile pepper delicious in many different types of sauces. It has a similar fla...vor as chipotle, but with a sharper level of heat. These can be used for beef or poultry and even in vegetarian dishes. The pepper is quite hot with a Scoville rating of 8,000 to 22,000. read more

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Urfa Biber, or Isot Pepper, is a dried Turkish pepper that hails from the Urfa region of Turkey, ("biber" means "pepper" in Turkis...h). It is technically a red pepper that ripens to a dark maroon. Sweet, smoky and citric aromas give way to a complex heat, which is mild at first, then slightly builds throughout the meal. Texture and notes of dried fruit, leather, and tobacco add to the complexity of this pepper. Rich and earthy, they're perfect as the desired dark, rich, smokey chile, without the overpowering, overused punch of chipotle. Because of the presence of stems and seed, it is hotter than Marash or Aleppo and better when compared to other pre-ground peppers, because of their high moisture and oil content, which amplifies their dark, roasted flavor, often described as "raisins meets coffee." Urfa Chiles are full of smokey, sultry flavors that pair well with hearty vegetables, pungent cheeses, and braised meats. For the more adventurous, use Urfa in desserts, by pairing with chocolate, vanilla beans, or gingerbread spices. Its large flakes yield a satisfying, chewy texture and its high oil content makes it far better for serving raw (without toasting or cooking in water/fat) than most chiles. read more

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