NEW Recipes from the August Issue

It's time to take it outside. We're sharing recipes that are best served al fresco with friends. Salute summer, from drinks to dessert, with the latest recipes from Better Homes and Gardens.

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How to Make Popcorn Balls

This all-time favorite dessert is offers instant nostalgia (remember Grandma making them?). Bring them into your own kitchen with our incredible easy steps.

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Dishes Made Better by Potato Chips

I chip, you chip, we chip. Our love affair with America's favorite snack goes well beyond the bag. We're sharing dishes that were made better (way better) by potato chips.

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Dress Up a Dessert in 8 Seconds (or Less!)

Make any dessert recipe worthy of a party with these easy ideas to dress them up. Each dessert idea can be done within 8 seconds!

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Canning Basics

Enjoy your favorite produce year-round by canning it. We'll walk you through how to can foods safely with less mess.

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How to Mail Cookies

Send your famous cookie recipe to loved ones anywhere! See how to pack cookies so they won't crumble and other tips for how to mail cookies.

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DIY Drink Stations

Our favorite party trend? Creative DIY drink stations that let party-goers play mixologist. We're sharing our favorite beverage stations, including an infused vodka station, a mojito station, and more. Once you set out the listed supplies, you're all ready to party!

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Popular in Food

How to Keep Picnic Food Safe

Food safety is especially important when eating outdoors, where food can spoil easily -- enjoy a worry-free picnic with these food safety tips.

Follow the same basic steps to keeping food safe in the kitchen for keeping outdoor picnic food safe. We show you how cleaning, separating, cooking, and chilling food helps to keep picnic food safe and spoil-free.

Keep the Food Clean: When preparing food for your picnic, clean your hands and prep surfaces often. Moist towelettes or soap and water will do the trick.

Separate Raw and Cooked Food: To avoid cross-contamination among different picnic foods, bring plenty of plates and utensils along. Designate some plates for handling raw foods and the others for handling cooked foods. Keep uncooked meats, poultry, fish, and shellfish separate from other foods and transport in tightly sealed bags or containers; pack them at the bottom of the cooler so that juices from these foods do not drip onto other foods.

Cook Picnic Food Properly: Use a food thermometer to make sure your foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature, and don't partially cook or grill food with the intent of finishing the cooking later.

Chill Picnic Food: When packing food into your picnic basket or cooler, remember these tips for keeping it at the right temperature:

  • Keep perishable foods at a temperature of 40 degrees F or below by packing them in a well-insulated cooler with plenty of ice or ice packs. A full cooler will maintain its cold temperature longer than a partially filled one. Thaw meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish in the refrigerator before taking it to a picnic. Wait until just before leaving home to pack perishable foods in the cooler.
  • Take two insulated coolers (one for drinks and the other for perishable foods) so warm air won't reach the perishables each time someone grabs a chilled beverage.
  • On your way to the picnic, place coolers in the coolest part of your air-conditioned car rather than the trunk. At the picnic location, keep coolers tightly closed in a shady area and add ice often.
  • Keep picnic food in the coolers until you need them; remove raw food only when you're ready to put it on the grill. (If you're grilling in batches, keep the food that's not being grilled in the cooler.)
  • Discard any perishable food left outside for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is above 80 degrees F).

How to Use a Meat Thermometer

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