How to Make Gluten-Free Flour Mix

With this ratio of white rice flour, potato starch, sorghum flour, and xanthan gum, we created a gluten-free flour mix that you can swap cup-for-cup for regular all-purpose flour.

See More

Scalloped Potato Recipes

Need some sure winners to add to your list of potato sides? Look no further than these gooey scalloped potato recipes. From classic au gratin potato bakes to modern twists featuring sweet potatoes or fruit, these buttery golden casseroles have it all: cheese, crumbs, and taters!

View Slideshow

How to Make a Single-Crust Piecrust

Learn how to make a pie with tender, flaky crust in 11 simple steps.

See More

How to Brine a Turkey

Learning how to brine is the simple secret to serving a moist, tender turkey (plus, it enhances the bird's flavor). For most turkey brine recipes, start with a stir-together saltwater solution and be sure to plan ahead, since marinating takes eight to 12 hours.

See More

Flavorful Green Bean Casserole Recipes

The fresh flavor and creamy texture of green bean casserole have made it a go-to side dish. If you're looking for ways to switch up the classic comfort food, turn to these green bean recipes that showcase what you love about green bean casserole while adding surprising touches.

View Slideshow

How to Mash Potatoes

Make mashed potatoes from scratch -- the creamy results are a special side dish for any dinner. See how our Test Kitchen experts make their mashed potatoes using two types of potatoes and a surprisingly simple process.

View Video
Popular in Food

How to Keep Picnic Food Safe

Food safety is especially important when eating outdoors, where food can spoil easily -- enjoy a worry-free picnic with these food safety tips.

Follow the same basic steps to keeping food safe in the kitchen for keeping outdoor picnic food safe. We show you how cleaning, separating, cooking, and chilling food helps to keep picnic food safe and spoil-free.

Keep the Food Clean: When preparing food for your picnic, clean your hands and prep surfaces often. Moist towelettes or soap and water will do the trick.

Separate Raw and Cooked Food: To avoid cross-contamination among different picnic foods, bring plenty of plates and utensils along. Designate some plates for handling raw foods and the others for handling cooked foods. Keep uncooked meats, poultry, fish, and shellfish separate from other foods and transport in tightly sealed bags or containers; pack them at the bottom of the cooler so that juices from these foods do not drip onto other foods.

Cook Picnic Food Properly: Use a food thermometer to make sure your foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature, and don't partially cook or grill food with the intent of finishing the cooking later.

Chill Picnic Food: When packing food into your picnic basket or cooler, remember these tips for keeping it at the right temperature:

  • Keep perishable foods at a temperature of 40 degrees F or below by packing them in a well-insulated cooler with plenty of ice or ice packs. A full cooler will maintain its cold temperature longer than a partially filled one. Thaw meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish in the refrigerator before taking it to a picnic. Wait until just before leaving home to pack perishable foods in the cooler.
  • Take two insulated coolers (one for drinks and the other for perishable foods) so warm air won't reach the perishables each time someone grabs a chilled beverage.
  • On your way to the picnic, place coolers in the coolest part of your air-conditioned car rather than the trunk. At the picnic location, keep coolers tightly closed in a shady area and add ice often.
  • Keep picnic food in the coolers until you need them; remove raw food only when you're ready to put it on the grill. (If you're grilling in batches, keep the food that's not being grilled in the cooler.)
  • Discard any perishable food left outside for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is above 80 degrees F).

How to Use a Meat Thermometer


Loading... Please wait...