NEW Recipes from the August Issue

It's time to take it outside. We're sharing recipes that are best served al fresco with friends. Salute summer, from drinks to dessert, with the latest recipes from Better Homes and Gardens.

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How to Make Popcorn Balls

This all-time favorite dessert is offers instant nostalgia (remember Grandma making them?). Bring them into your own kitchen with our incredible easy steps.

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Dishes Made Better by Potato Chips

I chip, you chip, we chip. Our love affair with America's favorite snack goes well beyond the bag. We're sharing dishes that were made better (way better) by potato chips.

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Dress Up a Dessert in 8 Seconds (or Less!)

Make any dessert recipe worthy of a party with these easy ideas to dress them up. Each dessert idea can be done within 8 seconds!

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Canning Basics

Enjoy your favorite produce year-round by canning it. We'll walk you through how to can foods safely with less mess.

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How to Mail Cookies

Send your famous cookie recipe to loved ones anywhere! See how to pack cookies so they won't crumble and other tips for how to mail cookies.

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DIY Drink Stations

Our favorite party trend? Creative DIY drink stations that let party-goers play mixologist. We're sharing our favorite beverage stations, including an infused vodka station, a mojito station, and more. Once you set out the listed supplies, you're all ready to party!

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Popular in Food

How to Chop Leeks

A relative of both garlic and onion, leeks have a milder flavor that's distinctive in all sorts of dishes. Leeks look like a larger version of a scallion, and need to be trimmed and cleaned before chopping.

The leek is a favorite vegetable of the British, French, and Italians, who have countless ways of serving this cylindrical stalk with layered green leaves. Leeks are usually cooked before eating and are enjoyed either warm or cold. Dirt tends to get in between the layers, so make sure you give your leeks a good rinse before using.

Purchasing and Storing Leeks

Leeks are generally available year-round. They should be crisp and healthy looking. Those smaller than 1-1/2 inches in diameter are more tender than larger ones. Store leeks in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

How to Slice a Whole Leek

Place the leek on a cutting surface. Using a chef's knife or large knife, cut a thin slice from the root end. Cut the dark green, tough leaves off the end and discard. Remove any wilted leaves from the remaining light-color section. This is the section of the leek that is tender and best for cooking. Hold the leek with one hand and cut it into slices of the desired thickness using the chef's knife. Place the slices in a colander and rinse thoroughly under cool running water. Drain the slices on paper towels before using.

How to Halve, Wash, and Chop a Leek

1. Another popular way to use a leek is to slice it in half lengthwise all the way through the root end with a chef's knife. Some recipes call for halved leeks. This is also a first step before chopping or slicing into half-moon shapes.

2. Before using the leek halves, wash them thoroughly to remove any dirt from between the layers. Hold each leek half under the faucet with the root end up. Rinse the leek under cool running water, separating and lifting the leaves with your fingers to make sure the dirt is flushed out. Drain on paper towels.

3. To slice or chop the leek halves, place each half, cut-side down, on a cutting surface. Hold the leek half with one hand and use a chef's knife to chop or cut it into slices of desired thickness.

Leek Recipes to Try:

Herbed Leek Tart

Mushroom, Leek & Seafood Chowder

Apple, Bacon & Leek Bread Pudding

Herbed Leek Gratin

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