How to Make Gluten-Free Flour Mix

With this ratio of white rice flour, potato starch, sorghum flour, and xanthan gum, we created a gluten-free flour mix that you can swap cup-for-cup for regular all-purpose flour.

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Scalloped Potato Recipes

Need some sure winners to add to your list of potato sides? Look no further than these gooey scalloped potato recipes. From classic au gratin potato bakes to modern twists featuring sweet potatoes or fruit, these buttery golden casseroles have it all: cheese, crumbs, and taters!

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How to Make a Single-Crust Piecrust

Learn how to make a pie with tender, flaky crust in 11 simple steps.

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How to Brine a Turkey

Learning how to brine is the simple secret to serving a moist, tender turkey (plus, it enhances the bird's flavor). For most turkey brine recipes, start with a stir-together saltwater solution and be sure to plan ahead, since marinating takes eight to 12 hours.

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Flavorful Green Bean Casserole Recipes

The fresh flavor and creamy texture of green bean casserole have made it a go-to side dish. If you're looking for ways to switch up the classic comfort food, turn to these green bean recipes that showcase what you love about green bean casserole while adding surprising touches.

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How to Mash Potatoes

Make mashed potatoes from scratch -- the creamy results are a special side dish for any dinner. See how our Test Kitchen experts make their mashed potatoes using two types of potatoes and a surprisingly simple process.

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Popular in Food

How to Chop Leeks

A relative of both garlic and onion, leeks have a milder flavor that's distinctive in all sorts of dishes. Leeks look like a larger version of a scallion, and need to be trimmed and cleaned before chopping.

The leek is a favorite vegetable of the British, French, and Italians, who have countless ways of serving this cylindrical stalk with layered green leaves. Leeks are usually cooked before eating and are enjoyed either warm or cold. Dirt tends to get in between the layers, so make sure you give your leeks a good rinse before using.

Purchasing and Storing Leeks

Leeks are generally available year-round. They should be crisp and healthy looking. Those smaller than 1-1/2 inches in diameter are more tender than larger ones. Store leeks in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

How to Slice a Whole Leek

Place the leek on a cutting surface. Using a chef's knife or large knife, cut a thin slice from the root end. Cut the dark green, tough leaves off the end and discard. Remove any wilted leaves from the remaining light-color section. This is the section of the leek that is tender and best for cooking. Hold the leek with one hand and cut it into slices of the desired thickness using the chef's knife. Place the slices in a colander and rinse thoroughly under cool running water. Drain the slices on paper towels before using.

How to Halve, Wash, and Chop a Leek

1. Another popular way to use a leek is to slice it in half lengthwise all the way through the root end with a chef's knife. Some recipes call for halved leeks. This is also a first step before chopping or slicing into half-moon shapes.

2. Before using the leek halves, wash them thoroughly to remove any dirt from between the layers. Hold each leek half under the faucet with the root end up. Rinse the leek under cool running water, separating and lifting the leaves with your fingers to make sure the dirt is flushed out. Drain on paper towels.

3. To slice or chop the leek halves, place each half, cut-side down, on a cutting surface. Hold the leek half with one hand and use a chef's knife to chop or cut it into slices of desired thickness.

Leek Recipes to Try:

Herbed Leek Tart

Mushroom, Leek & Seafood Chowder

Apple, Bacon & Leek Bread Pudding

Herbed Leek Gratin


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