NEW Recipes from the August Issue

It's time to take it outside. We're sharing recipes that are best served al fresco with friends. Salute summer, from drinks to dessert, with the latest recipes from Better Homes and Gardens.

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How to Make Popcorn Balls

This all-time favorite dessert is offers instant nostalgia (remember Grandma making them?). Bring them into your own kitchen with our incredible easy steps.

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Dishes Made Better by Potato Chips

I chip, you chip, we chip. Our love affair with America's favorite snack goes well beyond the bag. We're sharing dishes that were made better (way better) by potato chips.

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Dress Up a Dessert in 8 Seconds (or Less!)

Make any dessert recipe worthy of a party with these easy ideas to dress them up. Each dessert idea can be done within 8 seconds!

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Canning Basics

Enjoy your favorite produce year-round by canning it. We'll walk you through how to can foods safely with less mess.

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How to Mail Cookies

Send your famous cookie recipe to loved ones anywhere! See how to pack cookies so they won't crumble and other tips for how to mail cookies.

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DIY Drink Stations

Our favorite party trend? Creative DIY drink stations that let party-goers play mixologist. We're sharing our favorite beverage stations, including an infused vodka station, a mojito station, and more. Once you set out the listed supplies, you're all ready to party!

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Popular in Food

When to Buy Organic Foods

If the word "organic" appears on a fruit or vegetable, it probably costs more. Here's how to know whether to hand over that additional cash.

The next time you're in the produce aisle, you might find yourself comparing apples to oranges -- and that's a good thing. To reduce your potential exposure to pesticides on produce, it may be a good idea to look for organic labels on certain fruits and vegetables.

A few years ago, the term "organic" applied to anything food producers wanted. Then in 2002 the U.S. Department of Agriculture stepped in to regulate the meaning. Produce can be called organic when it is grown without synthetic pesticides and fertilizers and without bioengineering.

One basic rule: If you eat the skin or leaves of a fruit or vegetable, it's usually better to buy organic, according to Richard Wiles, executive director of Environmental Working Group, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit research group that examines food safety.

"When you buy organic, you'll know you're reducing your potential exposure to synthetic pesticides," Wiles says. "For some produce, we have found that even with washing it's difficult to remove traces of pesticides. Nonorganic strawberries, for example, can be washed 10 or 11 times and still show traces of synthetic pesticides." To sort out which fruits and vegetables are best bought organic, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) created a list of 43 produce items and ranked them according to pesticide loads, using data from the USDA and FDA.

"With this list we wanted to encourage everyone to eat more fruits and vegetables and to help guide consumers to choices that are least contaminated," Wiles says.

See the EWG's List

Here are phrases you'll see in stores and what they mean:

100-Percent Organic

When these words appear on a label, only organically produced ingredients were used in the food.

Organic

This means at least 95 percent of the product was organically produced. For fruit and vegetables, the word may appear on a small sticker on the fruit or on a sign above the produce display.

Made with Organic Ingredients

Other foods with at least 70 percent organic ingredients can use the phrase "made with organic ingredients," but the USDA organic seal cannot be used. Foods with less than 70 percent organic composition cannot display the USDA seal or the term "organic."

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