Beef Burger Recipes

When you're craving the meatiest, most succulent burgers around, page through this collection of irresistible beefy takes on the great American sandwich. The toppings won't disappoint: We stacked beef burgers with an assortment of final finishes, including fried eggs and tangy shredded pickles.

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How to Make Popcorn Balls

This all-time favorite dessert is offers instant nostalgia (remember Grandma making them?). Bring them into your own kitchen with our incredible easy steps.

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5-Minute Lunch Box Ideas

Lunch, fast. Two words that may mean a drive-through to you, but we have more than a dozen ways to pack your lunch box with a delicious meal in 5 minutes. Noon just got tastier.

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How to Make Kombucha

Kombucha tea is a fermented tea gaining popularity for its health benefits as a functional drink. You can find lots of kombucha tea products in health food stores and on supermarket shelves, but you can make kombucha at home using our kombucha recipe and tips for how to make kombucha, from making the SCOBY to bottling the finished kombucha.

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Quotes About Food That Nailed It!

You know those times you need to pause and rewind because a character in a movie or TV show just said something that's speaking directly to you? Food quotes make us do that. Here are some quotes about food that speak the truth.

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How to Mail Cookies

Send your famous cookie recipe to loved ones anywhere! See how to pack cookies so they won't crumble and other tips for how to mail cookies.

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DIY Drink Stations

Our favorite party trend? Creative DIY drink stations that let party-goers play mixologist. We're sharing our favorite beverage stations, including an infused vodka station, a mojito station, and more. Once you set out the listed supplies, you're all ready to party!

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Popular in Food

Counting Beans

Beans aren't just great additions to meals, they are also filled with essential minerals.

White Beans and Spinach Ragout

With their coats of many colors, dry beans are more than pretty packages. The skins -- in tints of sienna, earthly black, and red -- may deliver a potent nutritional boost. That means the lowly bean has joined the list of foods under the microscope. Researches have identified some surprisingly powerful substances tucked away in their skins. It turns out that beans contain eight flavonoids, plant substances that act as nature's dyes and give many fruits and vegetables their colors. Scientists say those plant chemicals act as antioxidants to give you some protection against certain cancers and heart disease. More research may lead to beans with more flavonoids, and a more powerful antioxidant effect. Meanwhile, some doctors suggest that the cooking liquid from beans be reused in soups. When you soak or cook beans, flavonoids leach into the liquids but aren't destroyed.

Bean Boosters

  • Add a handful of intensely flavored ingredients, such as Parmesan cheese, bacon, or prosciutto, to perk up a humble bean dish.
  • Use a canned variety of beans to cut cooking time to minutes. Rinse beans first to trim sodium levels. Rinsing also freshens the taste of canned beans.
  • Combine tomatoes, which are high in vitamin C, with plant sources of iron, such as beans. Your body will absorb more of the iron.
Great Northern Beans

The flavonoid factors are highest in red, black, and deep-colored beans. But all beans, including cream-colored navy beans and garbanzo beans, contain iron, folate, zinc, and a bit of calcium.

  • Iron. Beans supply anywhere from 1 to 4 milligrams of iron in every half-cup serving. That's an amount similar to what you'd get in a serving of beef. Your body does a better job of taking in iron from animal sources, but you can compensate by mixing a little meat in with the beans.
  • Folate. You probably know that women of childbearing age should eat foods rich in folate to help prevent neural-tube defects in their babies. You also need folate as you age to reduce your blood levels of homocysteine, a substance that puts you at greater risk for heart disease.
  • Zinc. Some people have trouble getting enough zinc, which is essential for your body's growth, insulin function, and immune system. Beans are an excellent source of zinc.
  • Calcium. Don't trade in your glass of milk or calcium-fortified orange juice or beans. However, every bit helps, and a half-cup serving of beans supplies 4 to 8 percent of the calcium you should have every day.

White Beans and Spinach Ragout This savory blend of bacon, cannellini beans and spinach is drizzled with a balsamic vinaigrette, for this perfect low-cal side dish.

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