No-Knead Focaccia Tiles

This fancy bread only looks tricky. The recipe starts with an easy dough you stretch into shape by hand then dress with colorful toppers -- briny olives, olive-packed tomatoes, zesty citrus, and roasted pumpkin seeds.

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3.5 by 22 people

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  • Makes: 12 servings
  • Makes: 6 tiles, 12 servings
  • Prep:
  • Stand: 12 hrs
  • Rise: 1 hr

No-Knead Focaccia Tiles

Reviews (0)

3.5 by 22 people

Rate This!

Directions

  1. In large bowl combine 3 cups of the flour, the yeast, and salt. Add 1-2/3 cups warm water (120 degrees F. to 130 degrees F.). Stir until all is moistened. The mixture will be a soft, sticky dough. Cover bowl and let dough stand at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours.
  2. Line a 15x10x1-inch baking pan with parchment paper. Brush parchment with olive oil. With a fork, stir the remaining 1 cup flour into the dough. Turn dough out onto prepared pan. Using well-oiled hands or a rubber spatula, gently push dough into pan (dough will be sticky). Cover; let rest for 1 to 1-1/2 hours or until puffy.
  3. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Using a sharp, floured knife, score dough into 6 portions. Gently press desired toppings into surface of dough. Brush lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle with desired seasonings. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden brown.
  4. Transfer to wire rack. Cut into 6 tiles. Serve warm. Makes 6 tiles, 12 servings .
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Nutrition Facts (No-Knead Focaccia Tiles)

  • Per serving:
  • 212 kcal cal.,
  • 6 g fat
  • (1 g sat. fat,
  • 1 g polyunsaturated fat,
  • 2 g monounsatured fat),
  • 429 mg sodium,
  • 35 g carb.,
  • 2 g fiber,
  • 1 g sugar,
  • 6 g pro.
  • Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet
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Reviews (1)

22 Ratings
1586 Days Ago
Yeast not only feeds on sugar, but also starch, which flour is quite abundant in. Starch is nothing more than long strains of sugar molecules, so yes, the yeast has something to activate with in this case. The key to activating the yeast properly is the temperature of the water and ingredients. In this case, 120-130 deg F added to the flour should bring the temperature of the mixture down to 80-95 deg F for best results. If too low, the yeast goes dormant and will not activate. If too high, you will kill it. I have made this recipe and the dough rose just fine as long as temperature of the water was measured and found to be within the 120-130 mark.

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