Do Dogs Dream?

Ever wonder what your dog is thinking while he sleeps? From twitching ears to even running in place, we explain what's going on when his eyes are closed.

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Why Do Cats Purr?

What makes cats purr? We walk you through why cats purr and what it means for your family feline.

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How to Introduce Cats and Dogs

Introducing dogs to cats can be nerve-wracking for new pet owners. We show you how patience, space, and carefully planned introductions will let your cat and dog live happily ever after.

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Why Do Cats Sleep So Much?

Wouldn't it be nice to sleep as much as your cat? Learn why cats are always, well, cat napping.

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How Do I Clean My Dog's Ears?

Cleaning dogs' ears can be an unpleasant task for pet and owner alike. Watch this one simple trick that makes ear-cleaning fast, easy, and frustration-free.

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Why Do Cats Like Boxes?

There's almost nothing cuter than cats playing in boxes. Learn why cats love boxes so much and how to help your cat maximize his playtime.

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How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging?

Keeping dogs from digging can be tricky -- dogs dig because it's fun! Learn how to curb or redirect this pesky behavior.

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Popular in Pets

Finding a Lost Pet

When your beloved pet strays from home, it can be a traumatic experience for both of you. Following these tips will increase the chance of a reunion with your lost companion.

When your beloved dog or cat strays from home, it can be a traumatic experience for both of you. Here are some tips that we hope will help you find your pet.

  • Contact local animal shelters and animal control agencies. File a lost pet report with every shelter within a 60-mile radius of your home and visit the nearest shelters daily, if possible. To find your local shelter go to www.pets911.com or check your phone book. If there is no shelter in your community, contact the local police department. Provide these agencies with an accurate description and a recent photograph of your pet. Notify the police if you believe your pet was stolen.
  • Search the neighborhood. Walk or drive through your neighborhood several times each day. Ask neighbors, letter carriers, and delivery people if they have seen your pet. Hand out a recent photograph of your pet and information on how you can be reached if your pet is found.
  • Advertise. Post notices at grocery stores, community centers, veterinary offices, traffic intersections, online at www.pets911.com, and other locations. Also, place advertisements in newspapers and with radio stations. Include your pet's sex, age, weight, breed, color, and any special markings. When describing your pet, leave out one identifying characteristic and ask the person who finds your pet to describe it.
  • Be wary of pet-recovery scams. When talking to a stranger who claims to have found your pet, ask him to describe the pet thoroughly before you offer any information. If he does not include the identifying characteristic you left out of the advertisements, he may not really have your pet. Be particularly wary of people who insist that you give or wire them money for the return of your pet.
  • Don't give up your search. Animals who have been lost for months have been reunited with their owners.

A pet -- even an indoor pet -- has a better chance of being returned if she always wears a collar and an ID tag with your name, address, and telephone number. Ask your local animal shelter or veterinarian if permanent methods of identification (such as microchips) are available in your area.

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