Kitchen Sink Basics

In deciding which sink is best for your kitchen, consider three factors: material, installation, and configuration.
Kitchen Sink Material Options

The most common kitchen sink materials all have pros and cons:

Cast iron lessens noise and vibration and holds water heat longer, but it is extremely heavy, and its enamel coating can scratch and discolor over time.

Composite materials, such as quartz or granite mixed with a resin base, are easy to care for, but they can be expensive, and their long-term durability has yet to be determined.

Fireclay is glazed surface that resists scratches and abrasions and won't rust or fade, but the material can stain.

Vitreous china is hard and nonporous with a glasslike shine, but it's hard to mold into large shapes, so options for bowl designs may be limited.

Solid-surfacing is easy to care for and available in a wide range of colors and patterns. The chief drawback is cost.

Stainless steel resists corrosion and is available in a number of finishes, but it is susceptible to scratches, and thinner grades can be noisy.

Continued on page 2:  Kitchen Sink Installation Options