Creative Backsplashes

There's a backsplash design for every decorating style. Find design inspiration in these beautiful surfaces that amplify interest by adding texture, color, and pattern to kitchen walls.

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DIY Kitchen Decor

Add personal style and fun decor to your kitchen and adjoining eating area without spending a lot of money. Take a look at these easy DIY projects.

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One-of-a-Kind Backsplashes

In a hardworking kitchen, a backsplash is an ideal opportunity to add a little personality. See how pretty materials and unique installations can bring a fresh face to your kitchen.

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Squeeze an Instant Pantry Into Any Space

Don┬┐t have built-ins in your kitchen? All you need is a sliver of empty wall to set up this instant pantry.

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Guide to Cabinetry

From Better Homes and Gardens, ideas and improvement projects for your home and garden plus recipes and entertaining ideas.

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Kitchen Countertop Ideas

Countertops are big part of your kitchen. Consider these up-and-coming materials to make a statement in your space.

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Dream Kitchen Designs

Attention to details, pro-grade appliances, and gorgeous materials and finishes all weave together in these dream kitchens that exude style and sophistication.

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Laminate Countertops Q&A

Expert advice on how to install tile over laminate countertops

Q: We just bought a house with bright orange laminate countertops. Can we install tile over this countertop? What kind of supplies do we need?

A: According to the pros, the correct method for installing tile is to remove the old countertop and replace it with 1/2-inch to 3/4-inch plywood, then add a layer of 1/2-inch cement board, and use tile adhesive to glue your tiles in place. Grout and then seal.

However, many homeowners (and even some professional tile setters) do install tile over laminate and have good results. But you should consider some issues because laminate counters were not designed as a base for tile. First, their base is usually made from particleboard, which swells when wet. If you nail into your laminate before adding the tile or if an edge of the particleboard is exposed to moisture under the tile, you run the risk of ruining the foundation for your tile. Plus, the laminate was designed so things wouldn't stick to it, which is why dried ketchup wipes up easily.

If you choose to install tile over the laminate, sand the surface and then use an adhesive, such as latex-modified mortar, to glue down the tile. Remove the sink before you start, and set it down over the new tile.

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