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Stylish Garden Markers

When you're ready to harvest herbs, you'll appreciate labels that make them easy to find. Stylish markers are a snap to make with common materials.

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These cute homemade willow markers will complement any garden.

Many catalogs, nurseries, and garden centers sell plant markers that help you find beloved plants season after season. But when you make your own markers, you get the extra satisfaction of being able to tell admirers, "Thanks, I made them myself."

Style your markers to match the theme of your garden. They'll serve as useful signposts and add a personal touch to your beds.

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What You Need:

  • Willow branches
  • Birch bark (from fallen tree)
  • Tin flashing, cedar shake or thin board
  • Copper nails
  • 16-inch sapling branch
  • Acrylic paint
  • Glossy polyurethane
  • Paintbrush

Instructions:

Step 1

1. Cut four pieces of 5/8-inch-diameter willow or other sapling branches. Pieces should be long enough for a 3 x 5- or 4 x 4-inch plant marker. Nail together.

Step 2

2. Cut a piece of birch bark (from fallen trees only), tin flashing, cedar shake, or thin board to fit frame. Nail to back of frame using copper nails.

3. To make a stake for the sign, nail a 16-inch-long sapling branch to the back of the frame, extending the top of the stake above the sign.

4. Using acrylic paint and a small brush, paint a plant name on the sign. Let dry, then coat entire sign, including ends of stake, with a glossy polyurethane.

Consider using these other materials to make personalized, homemade labels include:

Marker Options

  • Tiny terra-cotta pots mounted upside-down on stakes or sticks.
  • Large pieces of broken terra-cotta pots partially buried at the end of the rows.
  • Picture frames lashed to stakes.
  • Medium-gauge wire bent cleverly to spell each plant name.
  • Colored, translucent, acetate document holders, cut into shapes and slipped over sticks or stakes.
  • Punched tin or engraved copper.
  • Woodburned wooden stakes.
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