Upgrade a Basic Bookcase

Put a personal spin on an off-the-shelf bookcase with these easy DIY makeover ideas.

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Stairway Railing Ideas

Stairway railings serve more than a functional purpose -- they give stairs a visual presence and make a staircase a work of art. Find ideas for the perfect railing for your stairway.

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Beach Chic Porch Renovation

A family put a new roof over their heads by turning their back deck into a coastal-inspired covered porch. Learn how they made the big change from their existing porch to their new, cozy family hangout area.

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Give a Plain Mirror a Makeover

Take a plain mirror to the next level with these easy DIY embellishments.

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DIY Outdoor and Garden Projects

Sprucing up your outdoor space doesn't need to be a massive undertaking. Use these inspirational small projects -- including painting rocks to hanging new house numbers -- to instantly improve the look of a garden, patio, deck, or backyard.

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Add Storage Around Stairs

Step up your home's storage capacity by making the most of underused areas below and beside your stairs. Here's a look at 18 homes that beautifully optimized stairwell and staircase spaces.

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Popular in Home Improvement

Repairing Rotted Windows

Advice for rotting window sills.

Q: My family and I live in a 1930s-era home. There are a few windows that have rotting sills. We'd prefer not to have to replace the entire window. Are there epoxies that can be used to fill and reshape parts of old sills that have rotted?

A: Yes, you can use epoxy to repair a rotted sill of an old window, and that can actually be better than replacing the window. The great thing about using epoxy on a window is that you end up with something stronger than wood. Dig out the rotted wood and refill the cavity using products made specifically for this type of job. Go to a paint store and ask for a "restoration epoxy." Marine epoxies made for repairing boats are also effective.

If you do repair the sill, you'll want to figure out why it rotted in the first place and fix the problem. The No. 1 problem is neglect. If properly painted and maintained, a well-made wood sill can last 100 or 200 years. But if it's not maintained, water and weather will get inside the natural cracks in wood and cause it to rot. Another problem could be storm windows without weep holes, which are designed to move water away from the sill. And a third culprit could be an air-conditioner that sat on the sill and constantly dripped water on it. Without taking care of the underlying causes, you'll continue to have problems with rotting sills.

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