Auld Lang Syne

No one knows for sure whether Scottish poet Robert Burns wrote the words to this song (pronounced much like "old lang sign") in 1794 or was simply the first to record an old folk tune. Regardless, this has become the song best associated with New Year's Eve. Often only the first and last verses are sung, perhaps because no English translation of the lyrics has caught on. The order in which the verses appear is sometimes rearranged, depending on the source.


Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind?

Should auld acquaintance be forgot And days of auld lang syne?

Chorus:

For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne,

We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

We twa ha'e run about the braes, And pu'd the gowans fine;

But we've wandered mony a weary foot, Sin' auld lang syne.

Chorus

We twa ha'e paidled i' the burn Frae mornin' sun till dine;

But seas between us braid ha'e roared, Sin' auld lang syne.

Chorus

And surely ye'll be your pint stoup And surely I'll be mine

And we'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

Chorus

And here's a hand, my trusty frien' And gie's a hand o' thine

We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

Chorus

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