Health Benefits of Mustard

This humble condiment does way more than jazz up hot dogs and hamburgers. Spread some good health with these easy tips.

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Super Seeds

All forms of this summertime staple -- brown, yellow, Dijon -- are made from the seeds of various mustard plants. No matter what type you use, you'll get a dose of good-for-you benefits: Mustard is rich in selenium, which plays a key role in thyroid function, and magnesium, which is crucial to bone health as well as energy.

Salt Smarts: Choose a mustard with no more than 100 mg sodium (130 for Dijon) per serving.

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Better Together

For an extra health boost, add 
a spoonful of mustard -- the seeds, spread, or powder -- to broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage dishes. Mustard contains myrosinase, an enzyme that activates a cancer-fighting compound in these vegetables.

Golden Opportunity

Most yellow mustards get their brilliant hue from added turmeric, a spice known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties. Studies reveal that a compound in turmeric called curcumin
may protect against Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, and cancer.

Break Out of The Bun

With fewer than 5 calories per teaspoon, mustard is a low-cal way to take ordinary dishes from ho-hum to yum. Try these twists:


Start a Swap
Substitute mustard for half the mayo in tuna and potato salads, use 1 Tbsp. honey mustard on corn on the cob instead of butter, or top baked potatoes with a dollop of whole grain mustard and a dab of sour cream.


Soup Up Salads
Give basic vinaigrette a boost by whisking together
1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard, 3⁄4 cup olive oil, and 1⁄4 cup vinegar (for about 10 servings).

Reate a Crust
Coat chicken or steak with mustard before cooking. The spread makes a flavorful crust that seals in juices, so the meat stays extra-moist.


SOURCES: David Grotto, R.D., author of The Best Things You Can Eat. Elizabeth Jeffery, Ph.D., professor of Nutritional Pharmacology at the University of Illinois. Barry Ievenson, founder of The National Mustard Museum.

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