How to Get Blue Hydrangeas

If you love blue flowers (and who doesn't?), one of the most popular must-have plants for your garden is hydrangea. These versatile shrubs produce giant ball-shape flowers that look stunning in the landscape surrounding your home, as specimen plants in your garden, and make gorgeous (and easy!) bouquets.

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Flowering Perennials from Spring to Fall

Turn your garden into a color show spring through fall. Here are 17 easy-to-grow flowering perennials.

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Garden Pictures That Inspire

Garden pictures can provide inspiration. Browse our gallery of garden pictures, including landscape garden pictures, to find the picture of a garden that will give you your perfect landscape.

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Growing Lilies and Daylilies in Your Garden

Daylilies and lilies are two big-impact, easy-to-grow plants for your summer garden.

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How to Grow Potatoes

Growing potatoes is easy, and you'll find the taste of homegrown potatoes much better than that of store-bought versions. You can grow potatoes in just a few easy steps. Learn how to grow potatoes, as well as how to harvest them for maximum flavor.

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Urban Gardens

Living in a space-challenged urban environment shouldn't stop you from enjoying fresh air. Check out these great ideas from some amazing city landscapes.

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How to Get Beautiful Texture in Your Garden

Add beauty and texture to your garden with leafy and flowering perennials, annuals, and grasses.

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Make More Ferns by Sprouting Spores

Because ferns don't produce seeds, there's a special way to propagate them: growing spores. Here are tips.

There are a couple of ways to make more of the ferns in your garden. You can wait for them to grow (some spread faster than others) and divide them. Or collect and sprout their spores.

Spores are like little seeds, though they're much smaller and slower to germinate and grow. They're found on the fern fronds instead of a seed pod, capsule, or fruit. Spores appear as little bumps, often black or brown, lining the underside of some fronds.

Step 1: Gather the Spores To collect spores, place a mature fern frond on a piece of smooth white paper. The ripened spores will fall from the frond and onto the paper after several days.

Step 2: Plant the Spores Carefully fold the paper so the fern spores fall into the crease. Then sparsely sprinkle the spores over moist seed-starting mix. Mist the seed-starting mix with water after planting.

Step 3: Be Patient Cover the container with clear plastic after planting to keep the spores humid. Make sure the spores stay moist, but not saturated or soggy. Be patient. Spores can take several months to sprout.

Step 4: Plant the New Ferns Once the spores have sprouted, keep them humid until they're large enough to transplant. For most ferns, this is after they have at least three fronds.

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