10 Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Gardening

You might not believe it, but you were born with a green thumb. It may have gone untended for a while, but it's there waiting for you to nudge it awake. Put away your theory of being a plant killer, that anything dies under your care. Forget those nagging thoughts of where your garden will live or when you'll find the time, it's there somewhere. It doesn't have to cost a fortune and you'll get more than you give. So, here are 10 tips for conquering your fear of gardening:

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Summer Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Drought-Tolerant Grasses

Drought! The word itself strikes fear into the hearts of gardeners everywhere. Scarce water resources, especially in hard hit areas such as California and Texas, are making it almost impossible to maintain traditional style lawns. That's why many people are replacing their lawns with groundcovers and native plants. But for those who want a lush green lawn, here are some less-thirsty options.

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How to Improve Garden Soil

Many homeowners inherit bad garden soil ¿ but you don¿t have to live with it! Learn how to get the best garden soil possible through amendments, composting, and more.

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Top Shade Perennials

Shade plants are perfect for those tough spots in your yard. Learn about the best shade-loving perennials, including flowering shade perennials, partial shade perennials, and full-shade perennials.

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Landscape Ideas

Landscape ideas provide inspiration, and studies show that upgrading your landscape will add value to your home. Here are some great landscape ideas to improve your home's outward appeal.

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Garden and Landscaping Edging Ideas

Use these garden edging ideas to lend character, definition, and texture to your landscaping beds.

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    • Brick Landscape Edging

      Brick is a common landscape edging choice: It's classic, widely available, and relatively inexpensive. Push bricks tightly together to minimize spaces between them that turf can slip through. To prevent heaving and unevenness in your garden edging, set your bricks in a bed of sand.

      Note: If you set the brick just above the soil, you can use it as a mowing strip, running your lawn mower's wheel right over the brick. This eliminates the need for trimming.

    • Diagonal Brick Garden Edging

      Lay old, mismatched bricks on the diagonal for a 19th-century domino effect in your garden edging. Dig a trench and add several inches of sand for drainage so the bricks don't heave. Set the bricks in the trench, half exposed, leaning tightly one against the next, then fill in with soil. If you are edging several garden beds, lean all the bricks in the same direction.

    • Cast Concrete Edging

      Concrete garden edging eases mowing, and its serpentine shape creates a winding path through the landscape shown here. Varying heights add interest and allow for a smooth transition on a slope or uneven landscape.

    • Flagstone Garden Edging

      Edging your landscaping garden beds with flagstone lends a classic look that's particularly well-suited to country and cottage gardens. Flagstone is available in a number of colors and thicknesses so you can easily use it to coordinate or contrast your plants, other stonework in the landscape, or even stonework on your house. Irregular in shape, flagstones are durable and stack securely in the yard.

    • Rock Garden Edging

      Mix and match rock shapes and colors for a natural garden edge. Large multicolor rocks complement this landscape's informal style. Positioned in a winding pattern, the round boulders allow sweet alyssum to creep over and between the rocks, creating a lacy, scalloped look in this landscaped flower bed.

    • Cobblestone Garden Edging

      Square cobbles of granite garden edging combine with a hedge of Korean boxwood to give this landscape shape. 'Annabelle' and oakleaf hydrangeas add billowing blooms of white, their large leaves contrasting with the textures and shapes of the paving, edging, and hedge.

    • Garden Edging with Plants

      Low, mounding plants can be a fantastic landscaping garden edging choice. When planted in one long mass of draping color, low-growing plantings of sweet alyssum (shown here), veronica, bouncing bet, artemisia, coralbells, or candytuft soften hard edges and add a splash of color.

    • Recycled-Bottle Garden Edging

      Edge your landscape in colored-glass bottles to infuse your yard with a funky, down-home look. Bury the bottles neck down, side-by-side in the soil to use as garden edging. To keep turf or weeds from migrating from your lawn into your beds, sink a sheet of aluminum flashing about 8 inches into the ground alongside the bottles.

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      How to Build a Raised Bed

      Raised beds make growing any plant easier. Use these easy instructions to build your own raised beds.
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