A Gallery of Garden Shed Ideas

Add storage to your garden with personalized style. Our gallery of garden shed ideas shows you how.

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Editors' Picks: Top Rabbit-Resistant Plants

We've pulled together a gallery of some of our favorite plants that rabbits avoid in our gardens.

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Summer Garden Maintenance Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Throw a Garden Party

Greet the season with friends, flowers, and ice cream floats! Featuring pretty paper blooms and a blushing peach punch, this lovely garden gathering will have you celebrating summer in style.

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Add Interest to Your Yard with a Pergola

Create a landscape that looks good all year long with these creative ideas for incorporating a pergola into your yard.

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Make a Succulent Wreath

Succulent wreaths made from succulent plants require little water and are a great way to decorate your outdoor spaces.

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Popular in Gardening

8 Steps to a New Garden

Here are the steps to building a new bed or border from scratch.

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    • Step 1: Mark it Out

      Make your new garden the best it can be. Give it a fun shape with flowing curves or use it to echo the lines of your house. Get it just right by laying out a hose to outline your bed. Once you have the perfect shape, mark the edges with a line of sand or flour.

    • Step 2: Get Rid of the Grass

      If you have grass growing in your new garden spot, dig it up with a spade or sod cutter. Or, if you have time to wait, mow that area as low as you can, then cover it with a several-sheet-thick layer of newspaper and several inches of soil or compost. Wait a couple of months for the grass to die.

    • Step 3: Dig It Up!

      Now comes the digging. Dig up or till your new garden, removing any rocks, roots, or other debris. If you have poor soil, now's also a great time to incorporate organic matter, such as compost. Just dig it in while you work the ground.

    • Step 4: Edge Your New Bed

      Keep the lawn from crawling into your garden with a good edge. A trench about 8 inches deep and a couple of inches wide will stop even the worst invaders from crossing. Alternatively, sink an edging material around the perimeter of your garden.

    • Step 5: Site Your Plants

      Though it takes a little extra time, placing all your plants before you put them in the ground can make a world of difference. This allows you to get the spacing just right and make your plants really will look good next to each other.

    • Step 6: Get Planting

      When you know all of your plants are in exactly the right spots, plant them in the ground. It's helpful to loosen or tease the plants' roots before you put them in the ground, especially if they were rootbound.

    • Step 7: Spread Mulch

      Other than amending the soil, the best thing you can do to keep your new garden healthy and low-maintenance is to spread mulch. A 2-inch-deep layer of shredded wood or other material will do wonders for stopping weeds and helping your soil conserve moisture during times of drought.

    • Step 8: Water It In

      Once your bed is planted and mulched, give your plants a good soaking. Hint: If your mulch is dry, it may absorb some water before your plants can. Soak dry mulch well to make sure your plants get enough moisture.

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      Next Slideshow What to Prune When

      What to Prune When

      Take the mystery out of when to prune your plants by following our quick-and-easy guide.
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