A Gallery of Garden Shed Ideas

Add storage to your garden with personalized style. Our gallery of garden shed ideas shows you how.

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Editors' Picks: Top Rabbit-Resistant Plants

We've pulled together a gallery of some of our favorite plants that rabbits avoid in our gardens.

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Summer Garden Maintenance Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Throw a Garden Party

Greet the season with friends, flowers, and ice cream floats! Featuring pretty paper blooms and a blushing peach punch, this lovely garden gathering will have you celebrating summer in style.

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Add Interest to Your Yard with a Pergola

Create a landscape that looks good all year long with these creative ideas for incorporating a pergola into your yard.

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Make a Succulent Wreath

Succulent wreaths made from succulent plants require little water and are a great way to decorate your outdoor spaces.

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Popular in Gardening

Weekend Project: Make and Use Compost

Turn grass clippings and kitchen scraps into a gardener's dream soil.

Making compost is one of the smartest, most productive things you can do as a gardener. You'll turn yard and kitchen waste into rich, organic matter that's a valuable soil amendment for your garden and yard. You'll also reduce your garbage output, and help meet widespread restrictions now imposed for landfills. Contrary to common thought, a compost pile doesn't smell bad, attract pests, or create an eyesore.

As a natural process, compost happens when vegetative waste decomposes within weeks into fertile humus. Start by layering leaves, grass clippings, weeds, kitchen scraps (no meat, bones, or fat) and topsoil in a bin made for composting or in a pile on the ground. Water the pile if it is dry and doesn't decompose. Add leaves if it is too wet or starts to smell sour. Turn the pile once a season to speed decomposition.

Use compost in beds: Use rich, fertile compost as food for your garden's soil, to improve drainage and support healthy plant growth. Simply shovel the compost into garden beds and work it into the soil, using a garden rake. If you're lucky enough to make loads of compost -- or have access to a municipal source -- add wheelbarrows full of it to your garden each spring and fall. You'll build your soil's fertility as well as its water holding capacity.

Improve your soil: When building new beds or preparing a garden for planting, first work compost into the soil. Spread 2- to 4-inch layer of compost on the dry garden soil and till it in. Sprinkle compost on the lawn to feed it, too.

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