These 7 Foods Magically Regrow Themselves

Save your kitchen scraps to grow more of your favorite produce.

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Yes, you can grow food from food. These vegetables, fruits, and herbs regrow themselves, and some even grow in water alone. By regrowing your favorite produce, you'll spend a little less time in the produce aisle and a little more time in your kitchen and garden. Not to mention, you'll save some cash in the long run.

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Basil

Courtesy of Shrimp Salad Circus

There's nothing better than a batch of homegrown basil (did someone say pesto?). The fact that you can regrow basil in your kitchen makes it even better. Cut the plant a few inches below its highest set of leaves. You'll want a few inches of bare stem to hold the water. Place the trimmings in a jar or vase and fill with water. Keep the plant near natural light but not directly in light, and transfer to a pot once hair-like roots have sprouted. See Shrimp Salad Circus for more.

Lettuce

Courtesy of Getty Stewart

Grow lettuce straight from the fridge! Go ahead and eat your batch of lettuce, but leave the stem untouched. Cut the leaves about an inch from the bottom of the stem, and place stem in a shallow dish. Change the water every couple of days; after 10-12 days, you'll have bits of lettuce perfect for making small salads or topping deli sandwiches. See Getty Stewart for more.

Green Onions

Courtesy of Getty Stewart

Grow green onions on your windowsill—even while there's snow on the ground outside. Cut store-bought green onions to the remaining white root. Place roots down in a small, water-filled glass and set in a sunny spot. Replace the water every 2-3 days, and transfer to a pot if you'd like them to last longer. See Getty Stewart for more.

Ginger

Courtesy of EcoSnippets

Ginger offers countless health benefits, and gingerroot can be grown from itself. Plant gingerroot sections in a pot filled with soil, and water well. Start ginger as a houseplant in the fall, and then transplant to your garden in late spring when the ground is warm enough. See EcoSnips for more.

Pineapple

Courtesy of Bldg 25

To grow delicious pineapple at home, remove the root of the pineapple and cut off any extra fruit. Stick toothpicks into the stem, and set in a pot or glass wide enough so the base of the root can sit under water. Place in direct sunlight and your plant should start growing long, white roots within a few weeks. Transfer to a pot full of soil, and you'll soon have a tropical fruit growing right in your home. See Bldg 25 for more.

Potatoes

Courtesy of The Krazy Coupon Lady

You know those crazy sprouts that potatoes grow when they sit out for too long? They are called "eyes," and they are what you plant in the ground to grow new potatoes. To start, you'll need a big plot of garden space or a sturdy pot. Cut the potatoes into 2-inch cubes, ensuring that each piece has a sprout or two attached. Plant them a few inches deep in loose, well-drained soil. See The Krazy Coupon Lady for more.

Cherries

Growing a cherry tree from the pit is a time commitment (but so worth it!). Plant a cherry pit in potting soil in an airtight container, and keep it chilled in a refrigerator for approximately 12 weeks. Then transplant to a roomy place outdoors. Give it a few years, and your pit will grow into a tree and bear fruit! See Epic Gardening for more.

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