Holiday-Inspired Outdoor Decorating that Lasts

Dress up your front porch and yard with these holiday outdoor decorating ideas that last from the first days of fall through the New Year. They look great on a porch or just outside your door.

View Slideshow

Outdoor Christmas Decorating Ideas

Make the outside of your home as ready for the holiday season as the inside with these outdoor Christmas decorating ideas. Our holiday decorating ideas, including beautiful Christmas greenery, festive light displays, and more, are sure to get your yard Christmas-ready.

View Slideshow

Grow Beautiful Amaryllis

Amaryllis flowers are easy to grow from bulbs and great for adding color to your holiday decor.

See More

Deer-Resistant Shade Plants

Gardening in the shade where deer are plentiful can be a challenging situation. But there are plants that thrive in the shade that aren't tempting to hungry deer. Although no plant can be considered completely deer-resistant, here's a list of shade dwellers that most deer avoid. Plus, we've added some fun facts about deer that might help you understand them better.

View Slideshow

Shrubs with Winter Interest

A winter landscape has a beauty all its own. An unexpected plant feature -- winter blooms that perfume the air, bright berries, colorful or textured foliage or unusual bark -- add a welcome element to gardens. These winter shrubs will not disappoint.

View Slideshow

Tips for Moving Plants Indoors

Here's a handy guide for moving your favorite plants inside once the weather turns cold.

See More
Popular in Gardening

Dividing Herbs

Make the most out of the herbs already in the garden.

Step 1

1. Dig up. Divide plants in early spring or late fall when they are dormant (resting, not growing). Plants that grow in clumps, such as chives (shown), and those that increase via underground runners, such as mint, make good candidates for division. Dig up an entire plant or slice through the parent plant and take one section.

Ready to grow more edibles? Take a look at our guide to vegetable gardening.

Step 2

2. Cut. Divide the plant using a sharp knife or spade. Insert the tool into the middle of the plant and cut it in half. Repeat the process to divide a plant into quarters, eighths, or smaller sections. Each division must have roots and shoots. Some herbs, such as chives and lemongrass, divide easily by gently pulling them apart. For herbs that produce shoots from underground runners, such as mint and catnip, dig up the new plants and treat them as young transplants.

Step 3

3. Replant. Immediately plant new divisions to prevent their roots from drying out. If you cannot replant them right away, keep the roots moist. Set the plants out of direct sun until you transplant them.

Download our chart for easy herbs to start from seed. (Downloading requires Adobe Acrobat.)

Easy Herbs to start from seed

Download Adobe Acrobat


Loading... Please wait...