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Pea

Pisum sativum

Peas of all types are among the most coveted of spring vegetables. Peas are a cool-season crop, best grown in spring or fall in most regions. The three main types of garden peas are based on pod type. Most varieties grow best when trellised or trained on a fence.

Green peas -- also called English, pod, or shell peas -- are best picked just an hour or two before serving before their sugars can convert to starches. Be sure to plant plenty, because after all the shelling, there's almost never enough to sate everyone. Tender, sweet spring peas are a treat that's hard to get enough of.

Increasingly popular are snap peas, which bear plump, tender pods that are eaten pod and all. They're gaining fans because they don't need time-consuming shelling and no part of the pod goes to waste.

A favorite for years has been snow peas, which produce flat, tender pods that are eaten before the peas inside the pod swell to full size. They're great in stir-fries and Asian dishes.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

From 1 to 20 feet

Width:

6-12 inches wide

how to grow Pea

more varieties for Pea

'Maestro' pea
'Maestro' pea
Pisum sativum 'Maestro' is a 2-foot-tall shelling pea that is resistant to powdery mildew and enation virus, the two most serious disease problems to attack peas. 60 days
'Oregon Giant' snow pea
'Oregon Giant' snow pea
Pisum sativum 'Oregon Giant' grows 3 feet tall and bears tender, flat pods on disease-resistant plants. 60 days
'Sugar Ann' pea
'Sugar Ann' pea
Pisum sativum 'Sugar Ann' needs no staking. The 2-foot-tall plants bear 3-inch pods. 52 days
'Sugar Snap' pea
'Sugar Snap' pea
Pisum sativum 'Sugar Snap' is the granddaddy of snap pea varieties and still one of the best. The 6-foot-tall vines produce extra-sweet peas and pods, which have a tough string that must be removed before eating. 68 days
'Wando' pea
'Wando' pea
Pisum sativum 'Wando' is an heirloom shelling pea with good heat tolerance. Plants grow 3 feet tall. 68 days
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