Shrubs

Shrubs

Shrubs are a key foundation planting for many gardens. They offer structure and organizing points; many also supply year-round color, as well as food and shelter for wildlife. But selecting the right shrub for your landscape and particular gardening need can be difficult. Luckily, the Better Homes and Gardens Plant Encyclopedia provides information that will help with both practical questions and design problem-solving. For starters, you can choose shrubs that are sized to fit your landscape -- dwarf, mid-size, or full-height varieties, for example. You may also look for shrubs based on both scientific or common name and find shrubs that work best for your particular site constraints, such as USDA Hardiness Zone and amount of sunlight. You can also ensure the success of your shrubs with information on growth habit and design potential. View a list of shrubs by common name or scientific name below.

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117 Shrubs
Allspice Michelia, Michelia x foggii 'Allspice'
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
8 to 20 feet
Zones:
10-11
Type:
Shrub, Tree

An elegant tree or large shrub for tropical regions, Michelia  'Allspice' will form a striking privacy hedge or backdrop for an annual or perennial border. Fuzzy, copper-color flower buds open in spring and summer to reveal richly fragrant white blossoms that resemble magnolia flowers. The cup-shape flowers have a sweet banana scent and continue to open from time to time throughout summer. Glossy green leaves and a pyramidal form give Michelia 'Allspice' pleasing texture and shape in the landscape.

Plant Michelia in sun or part sun and moist, well-drained soil. Water regularly after planting to establish a deep, extensive root system.

Andromeda, Pieris japonica
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
5-8
Type:
Shrub

A wonderful foundation plant, andromeda features many seasons of interest, which also allow it to be used as a specimen plant as well. Also known as lily-of-the-valley bush, andromeda bears pendulous chains of puckered blooms in spring that closely resemble lily-of-the-valley flowers. While they may not be as intoxicating as the short groundcover perennial, they do have a pleasingly sweet, light fragrance of their own. If the bountiful blooms weren’t enough, andromeda also has extremely ornamental new growth that can be in glowing shades of orange and red.

Angel's Trumpet, Brugmansia
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
7-11
Type:
Annual, Shrub

A showstopping shrub that transforms any space into a tropical getaway, angel's trumpet boasts huge, pendulous blooms that perfume the air after sunset. And with its unique trumpet-shape flowers and quick-growing nature, this exotic beauty offers a multitude of reasons to give it a try in your own garden.

Arborvitae, Thuja
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
20 feet or more
Zones:
2-7
Type:
Shrub

These slow-growing trees create dense evergreen foliage that can make wonderful “living walls” when privacy is needed in the garden. Some varieties take on a bronze cast in the fall and winter, so be selective when picking an Arborvitae variety to plant in your yard. These trees stand up well to trimming and can be made into whimsical topiary plants to create living garden art. Arborvitae have long been used for their various medicinal properties.

Australian Tea Tree, Leptospermum laevigatum
Light:
Sun
Height:
8 to 20 feet
Zones:
9-10
Type:
Shrub, Tree

A charming tree for mild climates, Australian tea tree has artistic qualities. Its sculptural spreading branches take on a twisting and curving habit in time. They have a tendency to arch along the ground. Give this large shrub or small tree plenty of space to spread out. Plant it with other shrubs in a mixed border, or make it a focal point in a planting bed.

Australian tea tree grows best in full sun and well-drained soil. It is drought-tolerant after it is established, and it tolerates seaside conditions.

Banana Shrub, Michelia figo
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
8 to 20 feet
Zones:
8-10
Type:
Shrub

A grand Southern lady, banana shrub is a member of the magnolia family. Its lovely springtime flowers resemble magnolia blooms but have a bold banana fragrance. The evergreen shrub's flush of flowers in spring is followed by sporadic flowering through summer. Plant this lovely shrub in beds or borders, or use it as a fragrant hedge. It tolerates pruning well and can be maintained at 4-5 feet tall. Water banana shrub regularly after planting. After it is established, it tolerates drought with ease.

Barberry, Berberis
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
3 to 8 feet
Zones:
3-9
Type:
Shrub

Barberry is a tried-and-true classic throughout the entire growing season with its vibrant foliage. In shades of green, yellow, and rich burgundy, these plants make up for their lack of showy blooms with their constantly colorful foliage. Although these tough hedge plants used to be planted frequently, they are more and more being shunned as invasive plants. So if you are thinking of planting a barberry, make sure to check with your local authorities before making your decision.

Bay, Laurus nobilis
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
Under 6 inches to 20 feet or more
Zones:
8-11
Type:
Perennial, Shrub, Tree

A culinary classic, bay's glossy green foliage is a flavor favorite in soups, stews, and meat dishes. Bay only survives to 25 degrees, so it's commonly grown in containers, sounding a steady evergreen note on patios during the growing season and gracing sunny interior windows after frost. In the landscape, established trees are fuss-free and drought tolerant. Potted bay is susceptible to scale insects; hand-pick any offenders. Protect potted bay from intense sunlight in hottest zones. If you love to cook, keep dried leaves on hand; they're an essential herb for bouquet garni.

Bayberry, Myrica pensylvanica
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
3-7
Type:
Herb, Shrub

Bayberry forms a beautiful semi-evergreen shrub that tolerates either wet or dry soils. The shrub also withstands salt spray, making it a good choice for coastal landscapes. Plants gradually spread from underground suckers, eventually forming a thicket. Pruning is rarely necessary.


Bayberry has long been prized for its fragrant, waxy gray berries, which can be used to make candles. Plants are either male or female; to ensure berry production, plant several shrubs in the same landscape. The berries are also attractive to a wide range of songbirds. 

Beautyberry, Callicarpa
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
6-8
Type:
Shrub

Beautyberry is one shrub that's really earned its common name. In fall, the plant becomes a showstopper thanks to its clusters of small violet-purple fruits. The bright color stands out, especially after the plant loses its leaves. The fruits develop from summer's clusters of small pink flowers and may attract several species of birds to your yard.

Beautyberry blooms on fresh growth, so if you need to prune it, the best time to do so is late winter or early spring. In the coldest areas of its range, it's sometimes grown like a perennial in that the stems die back to the ground every year and are replaced by new shoots in the spring.

This adaptable shrub blooms well in full sun or part shade and is relatively drought tolerant.

Bluebeard Shrub, Caryopteris
Light:
Sun
Height:
1 to 3 feet
Zones:
4-8
Type:
Perennial, Shrub

Offering rare blue late-season flowers, bluebeard grows into a compact and flattering companion to other late bloomers such as asters and black-eyed Susans. The wispy bunches of flowers develop along the stems in midsummer to early fall. Silvery bluebeard foliage adds a little extra shine to the landscape.

Two tricks to growing bluebeard well: Prune the plants hard in spring when they begin to show new growth, and plant in well-drained soil to ensure the best bounceback after cold winters. A plethora of new varieties are available, including those with variegated green and white leaves, gold leaves, and pink flowers.

Blueberry, Vaccinium
Light:
Sun
Height:
From 1 to 8 feet
Zones:
3-9
Type:
Fruit, Shrub

Tasty blue fruits and colorful red fall foliage make blueberries outstanding additions to the landscape. Use them in mixed shrub borders and perennial beds for structure and interest as well as fruit production.

Blueberries demand the right climate and soil but take little care if you provide a site suitable to their somewhat exacting conditions. Growing blueberries requires a fair amount of cool weather in the winter and won't grow well in mild winter climates. They grow best in full sun, and well-drained, sandy, acid soil.

Plant at least two varieties of blueberries for cross-pollination. The most commonly grown blueberry is highbush. Lowbush blueberries grow just 1 foot tall and spread by underground stems to form a dense mat.

Boxwood, Buxus
Light:
Part Sun, Shade, Sun
Height:
From 1 to 20 feet
Zones:
4-8
Type:
Shrub

The poster child for traditional formal gardens, boxwood has seen its ups and downs in popularity over the years—but it always seems to bounce back. Because boxwoods are easy to manipulate and maintain into so many different shapes and sizes, they can always find a home in formal settings. And with their timeless glossy green leaves, they easily add elegance to any garden space.

Buckthorn, Rhamnus
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
8 to 20 feet
Zones:
3-9
Type:
Shrub

Most buckthorn varieties are easy-to-grow shrubs that make great privacy or backdrop plantings thanks to their dense habit and lustrous, dark green foliage. Many produce fruits that are poisonous to humans and animals, but attract birds.

Note: Unfortunately, many buckthorn varieties are invasive pests. In fact, common buckthorn is a noxious weed in many areas. Check local restrictions before planting them.

Bush Anemone, Carpenteria californica
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
9-10
Type:
Shrub

The sparkling white flowers of bush anemone will cool down the hottest afternoon. An evergreen shrub native to California, it is a great plant for the back of a perennial border or an informal hedge. Bush anemone grows well in full sun or part shade and tolerates a range of soil conditions but does best in well-drained soil. It thrives on neglect: do not fertilize, and water only during periods of extended drought.

Bush Poppy, Dendromecon rigida
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
3 to 8 feet
Zones:
9-11
Type:
Shrub

A tough shrub for challenging sites, bush poppy adds a sunny splash of yellow to dry, quick-draining planting areas. Covered with 2-inch-wide flowers from March through June, it is native to California and will quickly reach 6 feet tall in about two years. When not blooming, bush poppy's gray-green leaves provide pleasing texture and form in the garden. Plant bush poppy in full sun or part shade in well-drained soil. It does not tolerate clay well. Do not fertilize bush poppy. It grows and flowers best when it is lean on nutrients.

Butterfly Bush, Buddleja
Light:
Sun
Height:
From 3 to 20 feet
Zones:
5-10
Type:
Shrub

Drenching the air with a fruity scent, butterfly bush's flower spikes are an irresistible lure to butterflies and hummingbirds all summer long. The plants have an arching habit that's appealing especially as a background in informal flower borders. In warmer climates, butterfly bushes soon grow into trees and develop rugged trunks that peel.

To nurture butterfly bush through cold Northern winters, spread mulch up to 6 inches deep around the trunk. Plants will die down, but resprout in late spring. Prune to the ground to encourage new growth and a more fountainlike shape. Avoid fertilizing butterfly bush; extra-fertile soil fosters leafy growth rather than flower spikes. Remove spent flower spikes to encourage new shoots and flower buds.

Note: Butterfly bush can be an invasive pest in some areas; check local restrictions before planting it.

Butterfly Rose, Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis'
Light:
Sun
Height:
3 to 8 feet
Zones:
6-9
Type:
Rose, Shrub

Although your garden visitors may not believe you, this horticultural kaleidoscope is only one rosebush -- even though it blooms in three colors and varying shades thereof all at once. New foliage and bud sheaths are a coppery-bronze, and the established foliage is clean green and shiny to boot. And adaptability? The butterfly rose is disease-resistant, shrugs off humidity, and grows taller the more shelter it is given. This arching shrub is at its best covering a wall or tall fence, with its splayed, wrinkled petals flitting in a soft breeze. Spiffy, huh? That said, one proviso -- this is most certainly not the hardiest rose in the galazy. Mutabilis is almost exclusively a southern or western beauty.

Here's how the petal coloring works: At first a vivid orange, the buds open to a honey yellow, then the next day, after pollination, they become pale pink, deepening in the following day or two to nearly crimson.

 

California Bay Laurel , Umbellularia californica
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
20 feet or more
Zones:
8-10
Type:
Shrub, Tree

Adaptable and easy to grow, California bay laurel is native to the West Coast. It grows best in full sun to part shade, and when planted in full sun and watered regularly, it can grow as much as 4 feet each year. In partial shade with less-frequent watering, it is a slow-growing yet lovely plant. Its clean, green foliage is aromatic and often used in cooking. California bay laurel is a great choice for many areas of the landscape: Plant it in a container to enjoy it as a lush patio plant, add it to a mixed border for a pleasing touch of evergreen foliage, or use it as a shade tree. 

California Flannel Bush, Fremontodendron californicum
Light:
Part Sun, Sun
Height:
From 1 to 8 feet
Zones:
8-10
Type:
Shrub

This native plant is blanketed with showy yellow blossoms in spring. Notably drought-tolerant, California flannel bush thrives in hot, dry climates and fast-draining soil. It has a somewhat wayward growth habit, sending out a mix of long and short fast-growing shoots. What it lacks in form and outline, it makes up for in flowering when it explodes with color in spring. Trim the tips of overly long shoots to promote branching, and remove lower branches to create a tree form. California flannel bush is a great shrub for hillsides, mixed borders, and rock gardens. Quick-draining soil is a must.

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