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Sweet flag

Acorus

Although sweet flag looks like a grass, it is in a family by itself. Like grasses, though, sweet flags are grown for their textural foliage, especially the boldly variegated types. The plants grow best in moist soil and may even grow in several inches of standing water, making striking upright accents in water gardens or moist borders.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

Under 6 inches to 8 feet

Width:

6-24 inches wide

Problem Solvers:

Zones:

4-11


how to grow Sweet flag


more varieties for Sweet flag
Dwarf golden sweet flag

Dwarf golden sweet flag

Acorus gramineus 'Minimus Aureus' reaches only 4 inches tall but forms a clump up to 1 foot wide. Zones 6-11

Golden grassy-leafed sweet flag

Golden grassy-leafed sweet flag

Acorus gramineus 'Ogon' makes a 1-foot tuft of grassy golden leaves striped with green. Its foliage is evergreen in warm climates. Zones 6-11

Variegated sweet flag

Variegated sweet flag

Acorus calamus 'Variegatus' forms an upright plant with striking green-and-white striped foliage stretching 3 to 5 feet tall. Zones 4-11


plant Sweet flag with
Hibiscus

Hibiscus flowers might be the most dramatic in the garden and can bloom as large as a child's head in gorgeous colors. The hibiscus plant itself is large and dramatic, and it needs plenty of space to show off. Although the huge funnel-shape flowers seldom last more than a day, they are abundant and the plant blooms over several weeks. The large leaves tend to draw Japanese beetles. Hibiscus needs plenty of water, so grow it in rich, loose, well-drained soil where you can water it easily and regularly during dry spells.

Rush

The curious corkscrew rush loves wet or boggy conditions. It makes a fascinating architectural accent in planters, beds, and moist borders. It's technically leafless, with green cylindrical stems that are pointed at the tip. Plant rush alongside streams and ponds, though it will tolerate dryer conditions elsewhere. It's excellent in container gardens.

Pitcher plant

Pitcher plants are one of those cool carnivorous plants; they can devour insects. But don't let this amazing fact overshadow their inherent beauty. They produce fascinating pendant chartreuse or purple flowers in spring. Pitcher plants are fascinating to grow, and adapt well to containers where the plants can be observed up close. In mild regions, they can also be grown in acid bog gardens. They do not need a diet of insects -- the insects are attracted by nectar at the base of the pitchers and slide down and drown in collected liquid at the base. The tall pitchers of some species are cut and dried for indoor arrangements, but only remove a few to retain the vitality of the plants.

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