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Shasta daisy

Leucanthemum_ x _superbum

Easy, always fresh, and always eye-catching, Shasta daisy is a longtime favorite. All cultivars produce white daisy flowers in various degrees of doubleness and size. The sturdy stems and long vase life make the flowers unbeatable for cutting. Shasta daisy thrives in well-drained, not overly rich soil. Taller sorts may need staking.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

1-2 feet wide

Flower Color:

Seasonal Features:

Problem Solvers:

Zones:

5-8


how to grow Shasta daisy


more varieties for Shasta daisy
'Alaska' Shasta daisy

'Alaska' Shasta daisy

Leucanthemum x superbum 'Alaska' bears 3-inch-wide single white flowerheads with yellow discs on 2- to 3-foot stems. The flowers start to bloom in early summer and continue through fall if deadheaded routinely. Zones 5-8

'Becky' Shasta daisy

'Becky' Shasta daisy

Leucanthemum x superbum 'Becky' is an award-winning variety with strong stems and 3-inch-wide white flowers. It's a vigorous grower to 40 inches tall. Zones 4-8

'Cobham Gold' Shasta daisy

'Cobham Gold' Shasta daisy

Leucanthemum x superbum 'Cobham Gold' has fully double white flowerheads with a yellow disc. These bloom from early summer to fall, carried singly atop 2-foot stems. Deadhead to prolong bloom time. The plants make sturdy clumps of 8-inch long dark green leaves. Zones 5-8


plant Shasta daisy with
Bellflower

Romantic, usually bobbing, often blue bellflowers are classic cottage garden plants. Tall types look like something straight out of a fairy tale garden, while ground-hugging types are good in rock gardens, more formal gardens, and many other situations. Most are perennial, but a notable exception is Canterbury bells, a stately biennial (it takes two years to bloom). Flowers come in blue, purple, white, or pink. Shown above: Campanula carpatica

Daylily

Daylilies are so easy to grow you'll often find them growing in ditches and fields, escapees from gardens. And yet they look so delicate, producing glorious trumpet-shape blooms in myriad colors. In fact, there are some 50,000 named hybrid cultivars in a range of flower sizes (the minis are very popular), forms, and plant heights. Some are fragrant.The flowers are borne on leafless stems. Although each bloom lasts but a single day, superior cultivars carry numerous buds on each scape so bloom time is long, especially if you deadhead daily. The strappy foliage may be evergreen or deciduous.Shown above: 'Little Grapette' daylily

Phlox

Phlox are one of those bounteous summer flowers any large sunny flowerbed or border shouldn't be without. There are several different kinds of phlox. Garden and meadow phlox produce large panicles of fragrant flowers in a wide assortment of colors. They also add height, heft, and charm to a border. Low-growing wild Sweet William, moss pinks, and creeping phlox are effective as ground covers, at the front of the border, and as rock and wild garden plants, especially in light shade. These native gems have been hybridized extensively especially to toughen the foliage against mildew problems; many recent selections are mildew-resistant. Phlox need amply moist soil for best overall health.

Veronica

Easy and undemanding, veronicas catch the eye in sunny gardens over many months. Some have mats with loose clusters of saucer-shaped flowers, while others group their star or tubular flowers into erect tight spikes. A few veronicas bring elusive blue to the garden, but more often the flowers are purplish or violet blue, rosy pink, or white. Provide full sun and average well-drained soil. Regular deadheading extends bloom time.

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