A Gallery of Garden Shed Ideas

Add storage to your garden with personalized style. Our gallery of garden shed ideas shows you how.

View Slideshow

Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

View Slideshow

Editors' Picks: Top Rabbit-Resistant Plants

We've pulled together a gallery of some of our favorite plants that rabbits avoid in our gardens.

View Slideshow

Summer Garden Maintenance Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

View Video

Throw a Garden Party

Greet the season with friends, flowers, and ice cream floats! Featuring pretty paper blooms and a blushing peach punch, this lovely garden gathering will have you celebrating summer in style.

View Slideshow

Add Interest to Your Yard with a Pergola

Create a landscape that looks good all year long with these creative ideas for incorporating a pergola into your yard.

View Slideshow

Make a Succulent Wreath

Succulent wreaths made from succulent plants require little water and are a great way to decorate your outdoor spaces.

View Slideshow
Popular in Gardening

plant quick find clear

sunlight

flower color

foliage color

plant type

height

seasonal features

special features

problem solvers

Lobelia

Lobelia

Colorful lobelias are a wonderful choice for landscaping around ponds and streams -- anywhere the soil is consistently moist. In fact, lobelia even loves downright wet conditions, making it a top choice for bog gardens.

Perennial type of lobelia (not to be confused with the low-growing, often blue annual types) are magnets for hummingbirds, so they're great for wildlife gardens. The foliage is a handsome rich green to sometimes dark reddish purple. The plant produces striking spikes of flowers in all shades of red, pink, blue, and white. Lobelia needs humus-rich soil. Mulch with a biodegradable material, such as wood bark or chopped leaves, to add humus to the soil.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

From 1 to 8 feet

Width:

1-3 feet wide

Flower Color:

Foliage Color:

Zones:

2-10

how to grow Lobelia

more varieties for Lobelia

Cardinal flower
Cardinal flower
Lobelia cardinalis has upright 3-foot stems clothed with 3- to 4-inch-long, lance-shape dark green leaves. Brilliant red flowers are borne in loose spires. Zones 2-8
'Fan Salmon' lobelia
'Fan Salmon' lobelia
Lobelia 'Fan Salmon' bears warm salmon-pink flowers with contrasting bronze foliage. It grows 2 feet tall. Zones 4-8
'Fan Scarlet' lobelia
'Fan Scarlet' lobelia
Lobelia 'Fan Scarlet' is a stunning selection with bronze foliage and scarlet-red flowers. It grows 2 feet tall. Zones 4-8

plant Lobelia with

Primrose
Take a walk down the primrose path and you'll never look back! Primroses are a classic cottage flower and are popular with collectors. They covet the hundreds of different primroses available, especially some of the tiny rare alpine types.Many are staples of cottage gardens and rock gardens, while others provide spring color to damp places, rain gardens, and bog gardens. Their basal rosettes of oval leaves are often puckered or are very smooth. The colorful flowers may be borne singly or rise in tiered clusters, or even spikes. Provide humus-high soil that retains moisture and some shade for best results.
Iris
Named for the Greek goddess of the rainbow, iris indeed comes in a rainbow of colors and in many heights. All have the classic, impossibly intricate flowers. The flowers are constructed with three upright "standard" petals and three drooping "fall" petals, which are often different colors. The falls may be "bearded" or not. Some cultivars bloom a second time in late summer. Some species prefer alkaline soil while others prefer acidic soil.Shown above: Immortality iris
Astilbe
Astilbe brings a graceful, feathering note to moist, shady landscapes. In cooler climates in the northern third or so of the country, it can tolerate full sun provided it has a constant supply of moisture. In drier sites, however, the leaves will scorch in full sun.Feathery plumes of white, pink, lavender, or red flowers rise above the finely divided foliage from early to late summer depending on the variety. It will spread slowly over time where well-situated. Most commercially available types are complex hybrids.
Turtlehead
This native perennial gets its name from the shape of its unusual flowers, which resemble the heads of snapping turtles. It's a good choice for heavy, wet soils and spreads to form dense colonies of upright stems bearing pink, rose, or white flowers from late summer into fall. It grows best in some shade, but tolerates full sun with adequate moisture.
close
close
close
close
close

Loading... Please wait...