Holiday-Inspired Outdoor Decorating that Lasts

Dress up your front porch and yard with these holiday outdoor decorating ideas that last from the first days of fall through the New Year. They look great on a porch or just outside your door.

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Outdoor Christmas Decorating Ideas

Make the outside of your home as ready for the holiday season as the inside with these outdoor Christmas decorating ideas. Our holiday decorating ideas, including beautiful Christmas greenery, festive light displays, and more, are sure to get your yard Christmas-ready.

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Grow Beautiful Amaryllis

Amaryllis flowers are easy to grow from bulbs and great for adding color to your holiday decor.

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Deer-Resistant Shade Plants

Gardening in the shade where deer are plentiful can be a challenging situation. But there are plants that thrive in the shade that aren't tempting to hungry deer. Although no plant can be considered completely deer-resistant, here's a list of shade dwellers that most deer avoid. Plus, we've added some fun facts about deer that might help you understand them better.

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Shrubs with Winter Interest

A winter landscape has a beauty all its own. An unexpected plant feature -- winter blooms that perfume the air, bright berries, colorful or textured foliage or unusual bark -- add a welcome element to gardens. These winter shrubs will not disappoint.

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Tips for Moving Plants Indoors

Here's a handy guide for moving your favorite plants inside once the weather turns cold.

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These diminutive wildflowers are charming, shaped like an open bowl in white, lavender, purple, or pink. They get their name from the evergreen three-part leaves, with a shape reminiscent of the human liver, pointed or rounded on their ends and often with a deep purple cast. In the wild the plants grow in deep leaf litter in deciduous woodlands. Liverleaf is excellent in shady rock gardens or woodlands where the soil is humus-rich.


Part Sun, Shade



Under 6 inches


To 1 foot wide

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Who can't help but adore violets? Their cheerful "faces," often whiskered or otherwise marked, brighten the dreariest day in spring. Use them at the front of beds or borders as edging plants, as bedding plants, in containers and window boxes, in herb gardens, in wild gardens and in rock gardens too. There is a multitude of forms, many now winter hardy in cold climates, in all sizes and colors. Cut back straggly stems and deadhead routinely to prolong blooming. They self-seed freely, but are not invasive. Violets do best in lightly shaded places in soil that remains moist.
Trilliums are the royalty of woodland gardens. In spring, encountering a large, established patch in the wild is something to remember. Gardeners in temperate climates worldwide cherish trilliums, so unfortunately tens of millions have been dug from the wild. Luckily, dedicated enthusiasts have rescued millions, too. Buy from reputable dealers who specify that their plants are propagated from cultivated stock. Plant them 4 inches deep in deep, humus-rich soil that does not dry out, and apply a mulch of rotted leaves annually.
Take a walk down the primrose path and you'll never look back! Primroses are a classic cottage flower and are popular with collectors. They covet the hundreds of different primroses available, especially some of the tiny rare alpine types.Many are staples of cottage gardens and rock gardens, while others provide spring color to damp places, rain gardens, and bog gardens. Their basal rosettes of oval leaves are often puckered or are very smooth. The colorful flowers may be borne singly or rise in tiered clusters, or even spikes. Provide humus-high soil that retains moisture and some shade for best results.
Dog's-tooth violet
Dog's-tooth violets are the first sign of spring in the mountains, and domesticated varieties bring alpine glory to the garden. Their twisted, reflexed flower petals that bend over rosette leaves are a welcome discovery among last season's fallen leaves. The bulbs are native to woodlands and must be sited in well-draining soil rich in organic matter to flourish in home gardens.

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