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Popular in Gardening

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Hollyhock

Alcea rosea

The ultimate cottage garden choice, hollyhock sends up tall spires that cover themselves in flowers in beautiful colors. They're easy to grow from seed -- in fact, that's usually the only way they are found in garden centers.

Most hollyhocks are biennials, that is, they grow only foliage the first year, flower the second, and die that fall. However, if you establish a stand of hollyhocks, they'll reseed each year so there will always be plenty blooming. Interestingly, the flowers open from the bottom to the top of the spike throughout the summer.

These tall (up to 8 feet) beauties are ideal against fences or buildings where they can get natural support. Red forms are especially attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.

Light:

Sun

Type:

Height:

From 1 to 20 feet

Width:

1-3 feet wide

Flower Color:

Foliage Color:

Seasonal Features:

Zones:

3-8

how to grow Hollyhock

more varieties for Hollyhock

'Chater's Double' hollyhock
'Chater's Double' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Chater's Double' offers frilly double blooms in a range of colors from peach to pink, scarlet, purple, yellow, and white. Zones 3-8
'Creme de Cassis' hollyhock
'Creme de Cassis' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Creme de Cassis' bears striking, white-rimmed raspberry shaded flowers on 6-foot-tall stalks. Zones 3-8
'Indian Spring' hollyhock
'Indian Spring' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Indian Spring' is available with single pink, rose, yellow, or white flowers. Plants tower to 8 feet tall. Zones 3-8
'Old Barnyard Mix' hollyhock
'Old Barnyard Mix' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Old Barnyard Mix' grows 6 feet tall. The 3- to 5-inch wide single flowers may be deep red, pink, yellow, maroon, salmon, or even bicolor. Zones 3-8
'Peaches 'n Dreams' hollyhock
'Peaches 'n Dreams' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Peaches 'n Dreams' has ruffled, double peachy-pink blooms with overtones of raspberry and apricot. It grows 4-6 feet tall. Zones 3-8
'Queeny Purple' hollyhock
'Queeny Purple' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'Queeny Purple' grows just 2-3 feet tall, so it needs no staking and is an excellent choice for adding height to container gardens. A ring of broad lavender-purple petals surround a tuft of frilly central petals. Zones 3-8
'The Watchman' hollyhock
'The Watchman' hollyhock
Alcea rosea 'The Watchman' bears stately 6- to 8-foot tall stems of velvety black/maroon blossoms. Zones 3-8

plant Hollyhock with

Clematis
Clematis is undoubtedly the most versatile vine you can grow. Few other climbers offer such a broad range of bloom colors, shapes, and seasons. Dwarf clematis are great for growing in containers or along decks and patios; medium-size varieties look great intertwined in small trees. For a knockout mix, plant a blue or white clematis with a red climbing rose.Most clematis grow best in full sun and moist, well-drained soil.Note: All parts of clematis are poisonous.
Shasta daisy
Easy, always fresh, and always eye-catching, Shasta daisy is a longtime favorite. All cultivars produce white daisy flowers in various degrees of doubleness and size. The sturdy stems and long vase life make the flowers unbeatable for cutting. Shasta daisy thrives in well-drained, not overly rich soil. Taller sorts may need staking.
Shrub rose
Shrub roses take the best of the hardiest rose species, and combine those traits with modern repeat blooming and diverse flower forms, colors and fragrances. Some shrub roses may grow tall, with vigorous, far-reaching canes; others stay compact. Recent rose breeding has focused on developing hardier shrub roses for landscaping that need little to no maintenance.
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