quick find clear

More options

pick all that apply then click search.

sunlight

flower color

foliage color

plant type

height

seasonal features

special features

problem solvers

Heart-leaf brunnera

Brunnera macrophylla

In spring, a cloud of tiny blue flowers hovers above brunnera's mound of fuzzy heart-shape leaves. The plant prefers partial shade but can grow in full sun in cool climates provided it receives adequate moisture. Variegated forms need more shade; in full sun they're likely to scorch. It is sometimes called Siberian bugloss.

Light:

Part Sun, Shade

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

18-24 inches wide

Flower Color:

Seasonal Features:

Problem Solvers:

Zones:

3-8


how to grow Heart-leaf brunnera

garden plans for Heart-leaf brunnera

more varieties for Heart-leaf brunnera
'Jack Frost' brunnera

'Jack Frost' brunnera

Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost' offers 3- to 5-inch-wide silver leaves with narrow green edges and veins. It is more heat tolerant than other heart-leaf brunneras. Zones 3-8

'Looking Glass' brunnera

'Looking Glass' brunnera

Brunnera macrophylla 'Looking Glass' is silver all over with leaves that cup downward. The silver foliage makes its blue flowers stand out. Zones 3-8

Variegated brunnera

Variegated brunnera

Brunnera macrophylla 'Variegata' develops bold splashes of white edging on its leaves, which make its forget-me-not blue flowers appear to float on clouds. Zones 3-8


plant Heart-leaf brunnera with
Bleeding heart

It's easy to see the origin of bleeding heart's common name when you get a look at its heart-shape pink or white blooms with a protruding tip at the base of the heart. They grow best in partial to full shade in moist, well-drained soil. Some types bloom only in spring and others bloom spring, summer, and fall, provided temperatures aren't too high.

Primrose

Take a walk down the primrose path and you'll never look back! Primroses are a classic cottage flower and are popular with collectors. They covet the hundreds of different primroses available, especially some of the tiny rare alpine types.Many are staples of cottage gardens and rock gardens, while others provide spring color to damp places, rain gardens, and bog gardens. Their basal rosettes of oval leaves are often puckered or are very smooth. The colorful flowers may be borne singly or rise in tiered clusters, or even spikes. Provide humus-high soil that retains moisture and some shade for best results.

Your Comment:
close
X