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Gas plant

Dictamnus albus

Gas plant bears wands of cupped pink or white flowers on shining dark green foliage in mid- to late spring. When in bloom, it's one of the showiest plants in the garden. It's also a charming cut flower.

The flowers give off a flammable gas, which is the source of its common name. The combustible oil may irritate skin, so if you have sensitive skin, wear gloves when working with gas plant.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

2-3 feet wide

Flower Color:

Seasonal Features:

Problem Solvers:

Zones:

3-8


how to grow Gas plant


garden plans for Gas plant

more varieties for Gas plant
Purple gas plant

Purple gas plant

Dictamnus albus 'Purpureus' has purplish-pink flowers with dark veins and stems. As with all forms of gas plant, it is slow to establish. Zones 3-8

White gas plant

White gas plant

Dictamnus albus 'Albiflorus' has white flower spikes that develop into star-shape nut-brown seed pods in fall. Zones 3-8


plant Gas plant with
Peony

Perhaps the best-loved perennials, herbaceous peonies belong in almost every garden. Their sumptuous flowers -- single, semidouble, anemone centered or Japanese, and fully double -- in glorious shades of pinks and reds as well as white and yellow announce that spring has truly arrived. The handsome fingered foliage is usually dark green and remains good-looking all season long. Provide deep rich soil with plenty of humus to avoid dryness, and don't plant the crowns more than 2 inches beneath the surface. But these are hardly fussy plants. Where well suited to the climate, they can thrive on zero care.

Iris

Named for the Greek goddess of the rainbow, iris indeed comes in a rainbow of colors and in many heights. All have the classic, impossibly intricate flowers. The flowers are constructed with three upright "standard" petals and three drooping "fall" petals, which are often different colors. The falls may be "bearded" or not. Some cultivars bloom a second time in late summer. Some species prefer alkaline soil while others prefer acidic soil.Shown above: Immortality iris

Daylily

Daylilies are so easy to grow you'll often find them growing in ditches and fields, escapees from gardens. And yet they look so delicate, producing glorious trumpet-shape blooms in myriad colors. In fact, there are some 50,000 named hybrid cultivars in a range of flower sizes (the minis are very popular), forms, and plant heights. Some are fragrant.The flowers are borne on leafless stems. Although each bloom lasts but a single day, superior cultivars carry numerous buds on each scape so bloom time is long, especially if you deadhead daily. The strappy foliage may be evergreen or deciduous.Shown above: 'Little Grapette' daylily

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