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Forget-me-not

Myosotis

Charming, diminutive forget-me-nots are delicate plants with beautiful little blue flowers. While they do come in pinks and whites, it's the blues that people find most delightful.

Forget-me-nots are excellent in pots, as edgings, and planted close as a groundcover. These short-lived plants, mostly treated as biennials, reseed generously. The flowers have colorful, tiny yellow eyes and bloom in spring and into early summer. They are prone to damage by slugs.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

Under 6 inches

Width:

To 1 foot wide

Flower Color:

Seasonal Features:

Zones:

4-9


how to grow Forget-me-not

more varieties for Forget-me-not
Woodland forget-me-not

Woodland forget-me-not

Myosotis sylvatica blooms with clusters of fragrant, clear blue or white flowers with yellow eyes in early spring. Its hairy leaves may reach 4 inches long. Zones 5-9

'Victoria Rose' forget-me-not

'Victoria Rose' forget-me-not

Myosotis sylvatica 'Victoria Rose' blooms earlier than some other varieties with small yellow-eyed pink flowers over 4-inch plants. Zones 5-9


plant Forget-me-not with
Wild ginger

Wild ginger is a workhorse of a groundcover, spreading readily with beautifully glossy, slightly heart-shape leaves. It must have shade and moist but well-drained soil to thrive, but with the right conditions this native plant is indispensable, doing well where many other plants wouldn't.In spring it bears purplish maroon bell-shape blooms mostly hidden in the foliage.

Columbine

Perfect for cottage and woodland gardens, old-fashioned columbines are available in almost all colors of the rainbow. Intricate little flowers, they are most commonly a combination of red, peach, and yellow but also blues, whites, pure yellows, and pinks; they look almost like folded paper lanterns.Columbine thrives in sun or partial shade in moist, well-drained soil. Plants tend to be short-lived but self-seed readily, often creating natural hybrids with other nearby columbines. If you want to prevent self-seeding, deadhead plants after bloom.

Bleeding heart

It's easy to see the origin of bleeding heart's common name when you get a look at its heart-shape pink or white blooms with a protruding tip at the base of the heart. They grow best in partial to full shade in moist, well-drained soil. Some types bloom only in spring and others bloom spring, summer, and fall, provided temperatures aren't too high.

Corydalis

It's hard to find bright color for shade, so it's a puzzle that brightly colored corydalis isn't more widely planted. It's is an outstanding shade plant. Blooms are small, but they appear in clusters. Leaves look similar to those of fringe-leaf bleeding heart. Plants self-seed readily, but excess seedlings are easy to remove. Provide the plant with moist, organic soil for best growth.Shown above: Yellow corydalis

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