10 Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Gardening

You might not believe it, but you were born with a green thumb. It may have gone untended for a while, but it's there waiting for you to nudge it awake. Put away your theory of being a plant killer, that anything dies under your care. Forget those nagging thoughts of where your garden will live or when you'll find the time, it's there somewhere. It doesn't have to cost a fortune and you'll get more than you give. So, here are 10 tips for conquering your fear of gardening:

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Summer Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Drought-Tolerant Grasses

Drought! The word itself strikes fear into the hearts of gardeners everywhere. Scarce water resources, especially in hard hit areas such as California and Texas, are making it almost impossible to maintain traditional style lawns. That's why many people are replacing their lawns with groundcovers and native plants. But for those who want a lush green lawn, here are some less-thirsty options.

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How to Improve Garden Soil

Many homeowners inherit bad garden soil ¿ but you don¿t have to live with it! Learn how to get the best garden soil possible through amendments, composting, and more.

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Top Shade Perennials

Shade plants are perfect for those tough spots in your yard. Learn about the best shade-loving perennials, including flowering shade perennials, partial shade perennials, and full-shade perennials.

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Landscape Ideas

Landscape ideas provide inspiration, and studies show that upgrading your landscape will add value to your home. Here are some great landscape ideas to improve your home's outward appeal.

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Popular in Gardening

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Coreopsis

Coreopsis

One of the longest bloomers in the garden, coreopsis produces (usually) sunny yellow daisylike flowers that attract butterflies. Coreopsis, depending on the variety, also bears golden-yellow, pale yellow, pink, or bicolor flowers. It will bloom from early to midsummer or longer as long as it's deadheaded.

Light:

Sun

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

1-3 feet wide

Flower Color:

Foliage Color:

Seasonal Features:

Zones:

3-9

how to grow Coreopsis

more varieties for Coreopsis

Coreopsis grandiflora
Coreopsis grandiflora
Coreopsis grandiflora grows to 2-1/2 feet tall, with 2-inch-wide golden-yellow flowers. Zones 3-8
'Creme Brule' coreopsis
'Creme Brule' coreopsis
Coreopsis 'Creme Brule' is a more vigorous version of 'Moonbeam' coreopsis. It is hardy in Zones 5-9 and produces larger flowers all along its stem, giving the plant a fuller appearance.
'Domino' coreopsis
'Domino' coreopsis
Coreopsis grandiflora 'Domino' forms a lovely 15- to 18-inch-tall mound with spectacular gold daisies with a maroon center. Zones 4-9
'Early Sunrise' coreopsis
'Early Sunrise' coreopsis
Coreopsis grandiflora 'Early Sunrise' is a dwarf form that grows only 15 inches tall and blooms the first year from seed. It tends to be short-lived. Zones 4-9
Lanceleaf coreopsis
Lanceleaf coreopsis
Coreopsis lanceolata is hardy in Zones 3-8 and bears bright yellow daisies in May and June on plants to 2 feet tall.
'Limerock Dream' coreopsis
'Limerock Dream' coreopsis
Coreopsis 'Limerock Dream' is usually grown as an annual, even though it is hardy in Zones 6-9. It produces two-tone pink daisies on feathery plants. It requires good soil drainage over winter.
'Limerock Ruby' coreopsis
'Limerock Ruby' coreopsis
Coreopsis 'Limerock Ruby' produces deep pink daisies on feathery foliage that resembles that of threadleaf coreopsis. It's usually grown as an annual but is hardy in Zones 7-9.
'Moonbeam' threadleaf coreopsis
'Moonbeam' threadleaf coreopsis
Coreopsis verticillata 'Moonbeam' is a stalwart in the sunny perennial border. It is self-cleaning and has a long season of pale yellow daisies. Zones 4-9
Pink coreopsis
Pink coreopsis
Coreopsis rosea is the oddball of the family. It has pink flowers instead of yellow and prefers more moisture. Divide the spreading clumps yearly to keep it growing vigorously. Zones 3-8
'Zagreb' threadleaf coreopsis
'Zagreb' threadleaf coreopsis
Coreopsis verticillata 'Zagreb' grows to 18 inches tall and bears brilliant gold daisies on ferny medium green foliage. Zones 4-9

plant Coreopsis with

Salvia
There are hundreds of different types of salvias, commonly called sage, but they all tend to share beautiful, tall flower spikes and attractive, often gray-green leaves. Countless sages (including the herb used in cooking) are available to decorate ornamental gardens, and new selections appear annually. They are valued for their very long season of bloom, right up until frost. Not all not hardy in cold climates, but they are easy to grow as annuals. On square stems, clothed with often-aromatic leaves, sages carry dense or loose spires of tubular flowers in bright blues, violets, yellow, pinks, and red that mix well with other perennials in beds and borders. Provide full sun or very light shade, in well-drained average soil.
Veronica
Easy and undemanding, veronicas catch the eye in sunny gardens over many months. Some have mats with loose clusters of saucer-shaped flowers, while others group their star or tubular flowers into erect tight spikes. A few veronicas bring elusive blue to the garden, but more often the flowers are purplish or violet blue, rosy pink, or white. Provide full sun and average well-drained soil. Regular deadheading extends bloom time.
Yarrow
Yarrow is one of those plants that give a wildflower look to any garden. In fact, it is indeed a native plant and, predictably, it's easy to care for. In some gardens, it will thrive with almost no care, making it a good candidate for naturalistic plantings in open areas and along the edges of wooded or other wild places.Its colorful, flat-top blooms rise above clusters of ferny foliage. The tough plants resist drought, are rarely eaten by deer and rabbits, and spread moderately quickly, making yarrow a good choice for massing in borders or as a groundcover. If deadheaded after its first flush of blooms fade, yarrow will rebloom. If left to dry on the plant, flower clusters of some types provide winter interest. Flowers of yarrow are excellent either in fresh or dried arrangements.
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