Holiday-Inspired Outdoor Decorating that Lasts

Dress up your front porch and yard with these holiday outdoor decorating ideas that last from the first days of fall through the New Year. They look great on a porch or just outside your door.

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Outdoor Christmas Decorating Ideas

Make the outside of your home as ready for the holiday season as the inside with these outdoor Christmas decorating ideas. Our holiday decorating ideas, including beautiful Christmas greenery, festive light displays, and more, are sure to get your yard Christmas-ready.

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Grow Beautiful Amaryllis

Amaryllis flowers are easy to grow from bulbs and great for adding color to your holiday decor.

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Deer-Resistant Shade Plants

Gardening in the shade where deer are plentiful can be a challenging situation. But there are plants that thrive in the shade that aren't tempting to hungry deer. Although no plant can be considered completely deer-resistant, here's a list of shade dwellers that most deer avoid. Plus, we've added some fun facts about deer that might help you understand them better.

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Shrubs with Winter Interest

A winter landscape has a beauty all its own. An unexpected plant feature -- winter blooms that perfume the air, bright berries, colorful or textured foliage or unusual bark -- add a welcome element to gardens. These winter shrubs will not disappoint.

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Tips for Moving Plants Indoors

Here's a handy guide for moving your favorite plants inside once the weather turns cold.

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Blue-eyed grass


Foliage similar to iris and almost-glowing purple-blue flowers make blue-eyed grass a standout in warm regions. Native to parts of California and Oregon, blue-eyed grass is at home in a variety of soil types. It thrives in full sun and soil that ranges from sandy to dry. It can be very drought-tolerant, although blooming will be reduced slightly. Add blue-eyed grass to an easy-care mixed border, and enjoy its vibrant flowers from January through June.





Under 6 inches to 3 feet


6-10 inches wide, depending on variety

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how to grow Blue-eyed grass

more varieties for Blue-eyed grass

Blue-eyed grass
Blue-eyed grass
(Sisyrinchium angustifolium) forms clumps of grassy foot-long leaves. Its winged and branched stems carry small clusters of bright blue flowers, yellow at the throat. Each lasts a single day but there is a succession. Self-seeds freely. Zones 5-8
Aunt May blue-eyed grass
Aunt May blue-eyed grass
(Sisyrinchium striatum 'Aunt May') is a clump-former with clean gray green iris-like leaves striped with cream. The pale yellow flowers cluster on 20-inch-tall zig-zag stems. Zones 7-8

plant Blue-eyed grass with

Lupine draws the eye skyward with its gorgeously colored and interestingly structured flower spikes. Bicolor Russell hybrids are the most popular type. Their large pea-like flowers come in amazing colors and combinations, clustered in long spikes on sturdy stems.Lupine prefers light, well-drained soil that is slightly acidic, and it does not tolerate heat or humidity well. It performs best in areas with cool summers, especially the Pacific Northwest.
Perennial geranium
One of the longest bloomers in the garden, hardy geranium bears little flowers for months at a time. It produces jewel-tone, saucer-shape flowers and mounds of handsome, lobed foliage. It needs full sun, but otherwise it is a tough and reliable plant, thriving in a wide assortment of soils. Many of the best are hybrids. Perennial geraniums may form large colonies.
Named for the Greek goddess of the rainbow, iris indeed comes in a rainbow of colors and in many heights. All have the classic, impossibly intricate flowers. The flowers are constructed with three upright "standard" petals and three drooping "fall" petals, which are often different colors. The falls may be "bearded" or not. Some cultivars bloom a second time in late summer. Some species prefer alkaline soil while others prefer acidic soil.Shown above: Immortality iris
Play up the blue hues in the garden by pairing blue-eyed grass with the blue-green foliage of rue.
Santa Rosa Island sage
Count on this sage to bloom through summer, when blue-eyed grass is taking a flower break.
Yarrow's yellow flowers and silver-gray foliage are a lovely contrast to blue-eyed grass.

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