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Best Plants for Rock Gardens

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Popular in Gardening

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Black-eyed Susan

Rudbeckia

Add a pool of sunshine to the garden with a massed planting of black-eyed Susan. From midsummer, these tough native plants bloom their golden heads off in sun or light shade and mix well with other perennials, annuals, and shrubs. Tall varieties look especially appropriate among shrubs, which in turn provide support. Add black-eyed Susans to wildflower meadows or native plant gardens for a naturalized look. Average soil is sufficient for black-eyed Susans, but it should be able to hold moisture fairly well.

Light:

Part Sun, Sun

Type:

Height:

From 1 to 20 feet

Width:

1-1/2 to 3 feet wide, depending on variety

Flower Color:

Foliage Color:

Seasonal Features:

Problem Solvers:

Zones:

3-11

how to grow Black-eyed Susan

more varieties for Black-eyed Susan

'Autumn Colors' black-eyed Susan
'Autumn Colors' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Autumn Colors' is an award-winning annual series that bears 5-inch-wide gold flowers flushed with bronze, red, and rust. It grows 2 feet tall.
Brown-eyed Susan
Brown-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia triloba is a North American native biennial or short-lived perennial that has clusters of small yellow flowers in summer and autumn. It grows 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Zones 4-7
'Goldsturm' black-eyed Susan
'Goldsturm' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' is one of the most popular perennials of all time. It offers 3- to 4-inch bright yellow daisies, accented with a dark brown cone from midsummer to fall. It reaches 2 feet tall and is hardy in Zones 4-9.
'Indian Summer' black-eyed Susan
'Indian Summer' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' features bright golden flowers and hairy foliage. It grows 3 feet tall and blooms from summer to frost. Zones 3-7, but is often grown as an annual.
'Maya' black-eyed Susan
'Maya' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Maya' is an annual, dwarf variety with golden-yellow double flowers. It grows 18 inches tall.
'Prairie Sun' black-eyed Susan
'Prairie Sun' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia hirta 'Prairie Sun' features yellow-orange flowers from summer to frost. It's hardy in Zones 3-8, but it's usually grown as an annual.
'Radiance' black-eyed Susan
'Radiance' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Radiance' is usually grown as an annual and offers distinct double flowers with quilled petals. It grows 18 inches tall.
'Sonora' black-eyed Susan
'Sonora' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Sonora' is an annual type with large mahogany petals tipped in yellow. It grows 20 inches tall.
'Toto Lemon' black-eyed Susan
'Toto Lemon' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Toto Lemon' is a dwarf annual selection with cheery bright yellow blooms all summer. It grows 15 inches tall.
'Toto Rustic' black-eyed Susan
'Toto Rustic' black-eyed Susan
Rudbeckia 'Toto Rustic' is an annual type that bears with golden blooms with rich burgundy-red centers. It grows 15 inches tall.

plant Black-eyed Susan with

Fountaingrass
Like so many grasses, fountaingrass is spectacular when backlit by the rising or setting sun. Named for its especially graceful spray of foliage, fountaingrass also sends out beautiful, fuzzy flower plumes in late summer. The white, pink, or red plumes (depending on variety) continue into fall and bring a loose, informal look to plantings. This plant self-seeds freely, sometimes to the point of becoming invasive.
Russian sage
With its tall wispy wands of lavender or blue flowers and silvery foliage, Russian sage is an important player in summer and fall gardens. It shows off well against most flowers and provides an elegant look to flower borders. The aromatic leaves are oblong, deeply cut along the edges. Foot-long panicles of flowers bloom for many weeks. Excellent drainage and full sun are ideal, although very light shade is tolerated. Plant close to avoid staking since the tall plants tend to flop.
Aster
Asters get their name from the Latin word for "star," and their flowers are indeed the superstars of the fall garden. Some types of this native plant can reach up to 6 feet with flowers in white and pinks but also, perhaps most strikingly, in rich purples and showy lavenders.Not all asters are fall bloomers. Extend the season by growing some of the summer bloomers, as well. Some are naturally compact; tall types that grow more than 2 feet tall benefit from staking or an early-season pinching or cutting back by about one-third in July or so to keep the plant more compact.
Coneflower
Purple coneflower is so easy to grow and attractive and draws so many birds and butterflies that you simply must grow it, if you have the room. Valued for its large sturdy daisylike flowers with dropping petals, this prairie native will spread easily in good soil and full sun. It is bothered by few pests or diseases. It's a great cut flower -- bring in armloads of it to brighten the house. And birds and butterflies love it. Allow it to spread so that you have at least a small stand of it. Let the flowers go to seed and the goldfinches will love you, coming to feast on the seeds daily. Butterflies and helpful bees also love purple coneflower.It used to be that rosy purple or white were the only choices in flower color. Recent hybrids have introduced yellow, orange, burgundy, cream, and shades in between.
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