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Artemisia

Artemisia

Grow artemisias for the magnificent silver foliage that complements nearly all other perennials and ties together diverse colors within the garden. They're nothing short of stunning next to white or blue flowers.

They thrive in hot, dry, sunny conditions such as a south-facing slope. A number spread rapidly to the point of being aggressive, so consider limiting yourself to varieties listed below that are well-behaved.

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Light:

Sun

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

1-10 feet wide

Flower Color:

Foliage Color:

Seasonal Features:

Zones:

3-9

how to grow Artemisia

more varieties for Artemisia

Coastal sagebrush
Coastal sagebrush
Artemisia californica 'Canyon Gray' is a fantastic groundcover. Coastal sagebrush remains under 2 feet tall and forms a 10-foot-wide mat of fine textured silver-gray foliage. Zones 9-10
Mugwort
Mugwort
Artemisia vulgaris has a sagelike scent with mint undertones. Its primary use is in aromatherapy. Mugwort grows 2-4 feet tall and wide. The plant flowers from mid- to late summer with greenish-white blooms. Zones 5-10
'Powis Castle' artemisia
'Powis Castle' artemisia
Artemisia 'Powis Castle' is a hybrid form that grows upright to 2-3 feet tall. Its finely divided foliage stays put, making it a welcome addition to the border and container plantings. Zones 7-9
'Seafoam' Artemisia
'Seafoam' Artemisia
Artemisia versicolor 'Seafoam' has frothy contorted silver foliage that works well as a groundcover around taller, drought-tolerant perennials. It grows 8 inches tall and is hardy in Zones 4-10.
'Silver Brocade' artemisia
'Silver Brocade' artemisia
Artemisia stelleriana 'Silver Brocade' (also called A. stelleriana 'Boughton Silver') grows only 6-8 inches tall and spreads a foot or more wide. Its lobed woolly white leaves are ideal to soften the edge of a container or retaining wall. Zones 3-7
'Silver King' artemisia
'Silver King' artemisia
Artemisia ludoviciana 'Silver King' is a fast-spreading variety with bright silvery-white leaves that often turn reddish in autumn. Plant it on a slope in poor soil to prevent erosion. It grows 4 feet tall and is hardy in Zones 4-9.
'Silver Mound' artemisia
'Silver Mound' artemisia
Artemisia schmidtiana 'Silver Mound' forms a low mound of soft, fine-textured foliage to 1 foot tall that does not spread. Cut it back after its spring flush of growth to prevent the plant from flopping open midsummer. Zones 5-8
Southernwood
Southernwood
Artemisia abrotanum, or southernwood, has feathery gray-green foliage with a lemony fragrance. The leafy stems work well to make wreath bases or moth-chasing sachets for closets and dresser drawers. Deer and rabbits leave it alone. Southernwood grows 3-5 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Zones 4-10
'Valerie Finnis' artemisia
'Valerie Finnis' artemisia
Artemisia ludoviciana 'Valerie Finnis' offers lance-shape silvery leaves on an upright plant that grows 2 feet tall. Zones 4-9

plant Artemisia with

Russian sage
With its tall wispy wands of lavender or blue flowers and silvery foliage, Russian sage is an important player in summer and fall gardens. It shows off well against most flowers and provides an elegant look to flower borders. The aromatic leaves are oblong, deeply cut along the edges. Foot-long panicles of flowers bloom for many weeks. Excellent drainage and full sun are ideal, although very light shade is tolerated. Plant close to avoid staking since the tall plants tend to flop.
Salvia
There are few gardens that don't have at least one salvia growing in them. Whether you have sun or shade, a dry garden or lots of rainfall, there's an annual salvia that you'll find indispensable. All attract hummingbirds, especially the red ones, and are great picks for hot, dry sites where you want tons of color all season. Most salvias don't like cool weather, so plant them outdoors after all danger of frost has passed.
Veronica
Easy and undemanding, veronicas catch the eye in sunny gardens over many months. Some have mats with loose clusters of saucer-shaped flowers, while others group their star or tubular flowers into erect tight spikes. A few veronicas bring elusive blue to the garden, but more often the flowers are purplish or violet blue, rosy pink, or white. Provide full sun and average well-drained soil. Regular deadheading extends bloom time.
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