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If you love blue flowers (and who doesn't?), one of the most popular must-have plants for your garden is hydrangea. These versatile shrubs produce giant ball-shape flowers that look stunning in the landscape surrounding your home, as specimen plants in your garden, and make gorgeous (and easy!) bouquets.

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Flowering Perennials from Spring to Fall

Turn your garden into a color show spring through fall. Here are 17 easy-to-grow flowering perennials.

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Garden Pictures That Inspire

Garden pictures can provide inspiration. Browse our gallery of garden pictures, including landscape garden pictures, to find the picture of a garden that will give you your perfect landscape.

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Growing Lilies and Daylilies in Your Garden

Daylilies and lilies are two big-impact, easy-to-grow plants for your summer garden.

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How to Grow Potatoes

Growing potatoes is easy, and you'll find the taste of homegrown potatoes much better than that of store-bought versions. You can grow potatoes in just a few easy steps. Learn how to grow potatoes, as well as how to harvest them for maximum flavor.

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Urban Gardens

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How to Get Beautiful Texture in Your Garden

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Popular in Gardening

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Nasturtium

Tropaeolum

Nasturtiums are so versatile. They grow easily from seed sown directly in your garden's poorest soil and blooms all season until frost and are never greedy about food or fertilizer. Nasturtiums are available in either spreading or climbing types.

Plant spreading types in large containers to spill over the sides. Plant them alongside wide paths to soften the sides for a romantic look. Use nasturtium to brighten a rock garden or between paving stones. Plant them at the edges of beds and borders to fill in between other plants and add soft, flowing color. Train climbing types up trellises or alongside fences. The leaves and flowers are edible; use them as a showy plate garnish or to jazz up salads.

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Sun

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Height:

From 1 to 20 feet

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From 12 to 18 inches wide, depending on type

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more varieties for Nasturtium

Alaska nasturtium
Alaska nasturtium
(Tropaeolum majus 'Alaska') is a trailing variety to 12 to 15 inches. It offers exciting, white-splashed foliage and striking red, orange, gold, yellow, and salmon flowers.
Canary creeper
Canary creeper
(Tropaeolum peregrinum) offers lots of fringed canary-yellow blooms appear that look almost like butterflies in late spring. It climbs to 15 feet and is perennial in Zones 9-10.
Empress of India nasturtium
Empress of India nasturtium
(Tropaeolum majus 'Empress of India') bears velvety, crimson-red flowers on a compact, 14-inch-tall plant.
Jewel of Africa nasturtium
Jewel of Africa nasturtium
(Tropaeolum majus 'Jewel of Africa') is a climbing annual to 5 feet tall that has variegated foliage and blooms in red, gold, yellow, cream, or peach.
Peach Melba nasturtium
Peach Melba nasturtium
(Tropaeolum majus 'Peach Melba') offers salmon-peach flowers all summer long on compact, 1-foot-tall plants.
Strawberry Ice nasturtium
Strawberry Ice nasturtium
(Tropaeolum majus 'Strawberry Ice') bears deep yellow flowers with a strawberry-red blotch at the base of each petal. It trails or climbs to 16 inches.

plant Nasturtium with

Petunia
Petunias are failproof favorites for gardeners everywhere. They are vigorous growers and prolific bloomers from midspring through late fall. Color choices are nearly limitless, with some sporting beautiful veining and intriguing colors. Many varieties are sweetly fragrant (sniff blooms in the garden center to be sure.) Some also tout themselves as "weatherproof," which means that the flowers don't close up when water is splashed on them.Wave petunias have made this plant even more popular. Reaching up to 4 feet long, it's great as a groundcover or when cascading from window boxes and pots. All petunias do best and grow more bushy and full if you pinch or cut them back by one- to two-thirds in midsummer.Shown above: Merlin Blue Morn petunia
Cosmos
You can depend on this cottage-garden favorite to fill your garden with color all season long. The simple, daisylike flowers appear in cheery shades on tall stems that are great for cutting. The lacy foliage makes a great backdrop for shorter plants, as well. Cosmos often self-seeds in the garden, so you may only have to plant it once, though the colors can appear muddy or odd in the reseeders.Plant cosmos from seed directly in the ground in spring. Or start from established seedlings. This flower doesn't like fertilizing or conditions that are too rich, which causes the foliage to be large and lush but with fewer blooms. It does best with average moisture but will tolerate drought.
French Marigold
Just as you'd expect from something called French, these marigolds are the fancy ones. French marigolds tend to be frilly and some boast a distinctive "crested eye." They grow roughly 8-12 inches high with a chic, neat, little growth habit and elegant dark green foliage.They do best in full sun with moist, well-drained soil and will flower all summer long. They may reseed, coming back year after year, in spots where they're happy.
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