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The delicate, peachy-pink flowers of diascia are something a little different. Found with increasing frequency in garden centers, diascia is a snapdragonlike flower gaining popularity because you can plant it so early in the spring. A perennial in the southernmost regions of the U.S., it's a cool-season annual elsewhere. Plant it a few weeks before your region's last frost for early fall color, especially in containers.

In the bed or border, diascia is an airy pick that ties other plants together. It blooms in a wide range of pink shades -- from cool, bubblegum pinks to warmer tones of peach, coral, and salmon. After it blooms in spring, cut it back. It is likely to stop blooming for a while once summer heat hits. When things cool off, it will rebloom. It has average water needs, so don't over- or underwater. Fertilize lightly but regularly.


Part Sun, Sun



1 to 3 feet


1-2 feet wide

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how to grow Diascia

more varieties for Diascia

'Coral Belle' diasica
'Coral Belle' diasica
Diascia 'Coral Belle' has shiny foliage and coral blooms on 10-inch-tall plants.
'Flirtation Orange' diascia
'Flirtation Orange' diascia
Flirtation Orange Diascia is an extremely floriferous variety with great heat tolerance. It practically covers itself in orange blooms and grows 1 foot tall and 2 feet wide.
'Flirtation Pink' diascia
'Flirtation Pink' diascia
Flirtation Pink Diascia bears masses of pink flowers on a heat-tolerant plant that gets 12 inches tall and 20 inches wide.
'Sun Chimes Coral' diascia
'Sun Chimes Coral' diascia
Diascia 'Sun Chimes Coral' bears coral-pink blooms on spreading, 12-inch-tall plants.
'Whisper White' diascia
'Whisper White' diascia
Diascia 'Whisper White' bears pure-white flowers on 10-inch-tall plants.

plant Diascia with

Gerbera daisy
Gerbera daisies are so perfect they hardly look real. They bloom in nearly every color (except true blues and purples) and produce fantastically large flowers on long, thick, sturdy stems. They last for a week or more in the vase, making them a favorite of flower arrangers.This tender perennial will last the winter in only the warmest parts of the country, Zones 9-11. In the rest of the country, it is grown as an annual. It does well in average soil; it likes soil kept evenly moist but not overly wet. Fertilize lightly.
Few gardens should be without the easy charm of snapdragons. They get their name from the fact that you can gently squeeze the sides of the intricately shaped flower and see the jaws of a dragon head snap closed. The blooms come in gorgeous colors, including some with beautiful color variations on each flower. Plus, snapdragons are an outstanding cut flower. Gather a dozen or more in a small vase and you'll have one of the prettiest bouquets around.Snapdragons are especially useful because they're a cool-season annual, coming into their own in early spring when the warm-season annuals, such as marigolds and impatiens, are just being planted. They're also great for fall color.Plant snapdragon in early spring, a few weeks before your region's last frost date. Deadhead regularly for best bloom and fertilize regularly. Snapdragons often self-seed in the landscape if not deadheaded, so they come back year after year, though the colors from hybrid plants will often will be muddy looking. In mild regions, the entire plant may overwinter if covered with mulch.Shown above: 'Rocket Red' snapdragon
Stock offers a wonderfully spicy, distinctive scent. Plant it in spring several weeks before your region's last frost date -- this annual thrives in cool temperatures and stops blooming once hot weather arrives. It's especially wonderful in window boxes and planters at nose level, where its sometimes subtle effect can best be appreciated.Stock is slightly spirelike and comes in a wide range of colors. It makes a great cut flower, perfuming bouquets as well as the border. It grows best in full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil.

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