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Gardening Tips for Renters

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Popular in Gardening

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Angelonia

Angelonia

Angelonia is also called summer snapdragon, and once you get a good look at it, you'll know why. It has salvia-like flower spires that reach a foot or 2 high, but they're studded with fascinating snapdragon-like flowers with beautiful colorations in purple, white, or pink. It's the perfect plant for adding bright color to hot, sunny spaces. This tough plant blooms all summer long with spirelike spikes of blooms. While all varieties are beautiful, keep an eye out for the sweetly scented selections.

While most gardeners treat angelonia as an annual, it is a tough perennial in Zones 9-10. Or, if you have a bright, sunny spot indoors, you can even keep it flowering all winter.

Light:

Sun

Type:

Height:

1 to 3 feet

Width:

1-2 feet wide

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Zones:

9-10

how to grow Angelonia

garden plans for Angelonia

more varieties for Angelonia

Angelmist Dark Plum angelonia
Angelmist Dark Plum angelonia

Angelmist Dark Plum Angelonia is one of the darkest color selections; it bears deep purple flowers all summer and grows 2 feet tall.

Angelmist Lavender angelonia
Angelmist Lavender angelonia

Angelmist Lavender Angelonia offers clear lavender-purple blooms on 2-foot-tall plants.

Angelmist Purple Stripe angelonia
Angelmist Purple Stripe angelonia

Angelmist Purple StripeAngelonia is an eye-catching selection with deep purple flowers that have bold white edges. It grows 2 feet tall.

Serena White angelonia
Serena White angelonia

Serena White Angelonia forms a compact, mounding plant that stays about a foot tall and is covered in white blooms.

plant Angelonia with

Dusty miller
Dusty miller is a favorite because it looks good with everything. The silvery-white color is a great foil for any type of garden blossom and the fine-textured foliage creates a beautiful contrast against other plants' green foliage. Dusty miller has also earned its place in the garden because it's delightfully easy to grow, withstanding heat and drought like a champion.
Geranium
Geraniums have been a gardener's favorite for well over a century. The old-fashioned standard for beds, borders, and containers, geranium is still one of the most popular plants today. Traditional bedding types love hot weather and hold up well to dry conditions; many offer colorful foliage. Regal, also called Martha Washington, geraniums are more delicate-looking and do better in the cool conditions of spring and fall.Though most geraniums are grown as annuals, they are perennials in Zones 10-11. Bring them indoors to overwinter, if you like, then replant outdoors in spring. Or they can bloom indoors all year long if they get enough light.
Nasturtium
Nasturtiums are so versatile. They grow easily from seed sown directly in your garden's poorest soil and blooms all season until frost and are never greedy about food or fertilizer. Nasturtiums are available in either spreading or climbing types.Plant spreading types in large containers to spill over the sides. Plant them alongside wide paths to soften the sides for a romantic look. Use nasturtium to brighten a rock garden or between paving stones. Plant them at the edges of beds and borders to fill in between other plants and add soft, flowing color. Train climbing types up trellises or alongside fences. The leaves and flowers are edible; use them as a showy plate garnish or to jazz up salads.
Sage
You just can't overdo sage in the garden. This perennial herb earns its keep with fast-growing ways, beautiful blooms, and a flavor deer find distasteful. Once established, plants shrug off drought, although it's wise to keep plants well-hydrated through the hottest parts of summer if you want a steady supply of supple foliage.Some gardeners pinch out flower buds to keep leaves forming, but the blooms are beautiful. If you choose to let plants flower, when blossoms fade, cut plants back to beneath where flower buds formed. Don't cut back to woody stems that have no leaves; those most likely won't sprout again. Sage plants typically require replacing every 3-4 years, as plants become woody and produce fewer leaves.The uses of sage are beyond measure. Besides its popular use as a culinary herb, sage is also commonly pressed into service in cosmetics, perfumes, and soaps. Some naturalists rub it on their skin as an insect repellent. Hanging dried leaves among woolen clothing deters moths. Burning sage removes unpleasant odors, such as lingering cigarette smoke or cooked fish smells.
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